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Complete Health Indicator Report of Obesity Among Adults

Definition

Percentage of respondents aged 18 years and older who have a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30.0 kg/m^2^ calculated from self-reported weight and height.

Numerator

Number of respondents aged 18 years and older who have a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30.0 kg/m^2^ calculated from self-reported weight and height.

Denominator

Number of respondents aged 18 years and older for whom BMI can be calculated from their self-reported weight and height (excludes unknowns or refusals for weight and height).

Data Interpretation Issues

Height and weight are self-reported and are subject to being misreported. To reduce bias and more accurately represent population data, the BRFSS has changed survey methodology. In 2010, it began conducting surveys by cellular phone in addition to landline phones. It also adopted "iterative proportional fitting" (raking) as its weighting method. More details about these changes can be found at: [https://ibis.health.utah.gov/pdf/opha/resource/brfss/RakingImpact2011.pdf/ Raking Fact Sheet 2011].

Why Is This Important?

Obesity can be costly and serious. Adults who are obese have an increased risk of hypertension, high LDL cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, and osteoarthritis.

Healthy People Objective NWS-9:

Reduce the proportion of adults who are obese
U.S. Target: 30.5 percent
State Target: 24.0 percent

Other Objectives

The new U.S. Healthy People 2030 objective is Nutrition and Weight Status 03 (NWS-03): Reduce the proportion of adults with obesity. The U.S. target has been set for 36.0 percent of adults aged 20 or over. Data Source: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS See [https://health.gov/healthypeople/objectives-and-data/browse-objectives/overweight-and-obesity/reduce-proportion-adults-obesity-nws-03/ HealthyPeople 2030].

How Are We Doing?

The age-adjusted percentage of Utah adults (18+) who were obese increased from 19.5% in 2000 to 31.8% in 2021. Nevertheless, Utah still has a lower obesity rate than most states. A release from CDC (2022) maps prevalence by state. See [http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/prevalence-maps.html/ Adult Obesity Prevalence Maps].

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

The age-adjusted prevalence of obesity in Utah adults is slightly lower than the U.S. In 2021, the obesity prevalence rate in Utah adults was 31.8%, while the prevalence for U.S. adults was 33.3% (18+).

What Is Being Done?

The Utah Department of Health and Human Service's Healthy Environments Active Living (HEAL) Program plays a key role in improving the health of residents in the state of Utah. The program was formed in July 2013 (as Healthy Living through Environment, Policy, and Improved Clinical Care: EPICC), through a new funding opportunity from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that allowed for the merging of three previously existing programs: the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program, the Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, and the Physical Activity, Nutrition and Obesity Program, as well as the addition of a school health program. HEAL was recently restructured as part of a strategic planning process and the new program model focuses on staff and partners working together to address the social determinants of health while advancing health equity and increasing policy, systems and environmental changes. HEAL works: In schools:[[br]] HEAL encourages schools to adopt the Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. This framework encourages students to be physically active for 60 minutes a day through school, home, and community activities. HEAL also tracks height and weight trends in elementary school students. In worksites:[[br]] HEAL offers training on developing worksite wellness programs called Work@Health. HEAL partners with local health departments to encourage worksites to complete the CDC Scorecard and participate in yearly health risk assessments for their employees. HEAL provides toolkits and other resources for employers interested in implementing wellness programs [https://heal.health.utah.gov/worksite-wellness/ Worksite Wellness]. In communities:[[br]] HEAL receives federal funding to partner with worksites and community-based organizations to increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables in worksite and community settings. HEAlL also partners with LHDs to work with cities and/or counties within their jurisdictions to create a built environment that encourages physical activity. In healthcare:[[br]] HEAL works with health care systems to establish community clinical linkages to support individuals at risk for or diagnosed with diabetes or hypertension to engage in lifestyle change programs such as chronic disease self-management and diabetes prevention programs. In childcare:[[br]] HEAL works with state and local partners through the Childcare Obesity Prevention workgroup to implement policy and systems changes in early care and education across agencies statewide. Ten local health departments statewide have implemented the TOP Star program, which aims to improve the nutrition, physical activity, and breastfeeding policies and environments and achieve best practices in childcare centers and homes.[[br]]

Available Services

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services houses the Healthy Environments Active Living (HEAL) Program. The [https://heal.health.utah.gov/ HEAL website] has information on healthy living, including prevention of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

Health Program Information

Overarching Goals: Healthy People: Increase access to resources that empower all people in Utah to reach their full health potential. Healthy Communities: Increase the capacity of communities to support and promote healthy living for all individuals. Equitable Society: Increase opportunities for people who are under-resourced and under-represented in Utah to live healthy and thriving lives. Staff from the [https://heal.health.utah.gov/ HEAL] Program work with health care providers, including diabetes educators, dietitians, pharmacists, community health centers, community health workers, work-sites, and health plans to improve the care provided to Utahns with diabetes. Originally known as EPICC, (The Healthy Living through Environment, Policy, and Improved Clinical Care Program), the Healthy Environments Active Living (HEAL) Program is a program within the Utah Department of Health Bureau of Health Promotion. HEAL focuses on enabling education and engaged change for public health by engaging its three main audiences: individuals, partners, and decision makers. HEAL champions public health initiatives and addresses the challenges of making health awareness and access truly universal and equitable in eight key areas: nutrition, heart health, diabetes, physical activity, schools, child care, community health workers, and worksites.


Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics

There are considerable differences in the prevalence of obesity by subpopulations. For example, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander adults and American Indian/Alaskan Native adults tend to have higher rates than the state rate.

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Health Care System Factors

The cost of obesity is hard to specify, as the methods used can be very different for each study. One study, using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, found that medical costs for obese adults can be 42% higher than costs for adults at a normal weight for both public and private payers [Finkelstein EA, Trogdon JG, Cohen JW, Dietz W. Annual Medical Spending Attributable to Obesity: Payer-and Service-Specific Estimates. Health Affairs, 28(5): w822-831, 2009].

Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:


Risk Factors

There are things that people can do that can reduce their risk of obesity. Behaviors such as engaging in physical activity and having a healthy diet can have a significant impact on reducing the risk (see [https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/adult/causes.html/ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Overweight & Obesity: Adult Obesity Causes & Consequences.]).

Related Risk Factors Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Adult Obesity, Utah and U.S., 1989-2021

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confidence limits

Obesity in the U.S. and in Utah continues to increase.
BRFSS Utah vs. U.S.YearAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 68
UT Old Methodology198910.5%8.9%12.1%
UT Old Methodology19909.9%8.3%11.5%
UT Old Methodology199111.0%9.3%12.7%
UT Old Methodology199212.4%10.6%14.2%
UT Old Methodology199312.0%10.3%13.7%
UT Old Methodology199412.4%10.7%14.0%
UT Old Methodology199513.7%12.0%15.4%
UT Old Methodology199613.9%12.1%15.7%
UT Old Methodology199715.8%14.1%17.5%
UT Old Methodology199816.5%14.5%18.4%
UT Old Methodology199916.9%15.1%18.8%
UT Old Methodology200019.5%17.6%21.5%
UT Old Methodology200119.3%17.7%21.0%
UT Old Methodology200219.0%17.4%20.6%
UT Old Methodology200321.5%19.8%23.3%
UT Old Methodology200421.1%19.7%22.4%
UT Old Methodology200522.1%20.7%23.5%
UT Old Methodology200622.8%21.5%24.3%
UT Old Methodology200723.1%21.7%24.6%
UT Old Methodology200824.0%22.6%25.5%
UT Old Methodology200924.8%23.7%25.9%
UT Old Methodology201024.0%22.9%25.1%
US Old Methodology198911.3%10.9%11.7%
US Old Methodology199011.9%11.5%12.3%
US Old Methodology199112.8%12.4%13.2%
US Old Methodology199213.5%13.2%13.9%
US Old Methodology199314.4%14.1%14.8%
US Old Methodology199415.1%14.8%15.5%
US Old Methodology199515.9%15.5%16.3%
US Old Methodology199616.4%16.1%16.7%
US Old Methodology199716.9%16.6%17.3%
US Old Methodology199818.4%18.1%18.8%
US Old Methodology199919.4%19.1%19.8%
US Old Methodology200020.3%20.0%20.7%
US Old Methodology200121.6%21.3%21.9%
US Old Methodology200221.8%21.4%22.1%
US Old Methodology200322.7%22.4%23.0%
US Old Methodology200423.4%23.1%23.7%
US Old Methodology200524.4%24.1%24.7%
US Old Methodology200625.0%24.6%25.3%
US Old Methodology200725.9%25.6%26.2%
US Old Methodology200826.5%26.2%26.8%
US Old Methodology200927.1%26.8%27.4%
US Old Methodology201027.4%27.1%27.7%
UT New Methodology200925.5%24.4%26.6%
UT New Methodology201025.2%24.2%26.3%
UT New Methodology201125.2%24.2%26.2%
UT New Methodology201225.0%24.0%26.0%
UT New Methodology201325.1%24.1%26.0%
UT New Methodology201426.6%25.7%27.4%
UT New Methodology201525.2%24.2%26.2%
UT New Methodology201626.2%25.1%27.4%
UT New Methodology201726.0%24.9%27.1%
UT New Methodology201828.4%27.3%29.5%
UT New Methodology201929.9%28.8%31.0%
UT New Methodology202029.4%28.2%30.5%
UT New Methodology202131.8%30.6%32.9%
US New Methodology201127.4%27.1%27.6%
US New Methodology201227.7%27.4%28.0%
US New Methodology201328.3%28.0%28.6%
US New Methodology201429.0%28.7%29.2%
US New Methodology201528.9%28.6%29.2%
US New Methodology201629.6%29.4%29.9%
US New Methodology201730.1%29.8%30.4%
US New Methodology201831.1%30.8%31.4%
US New Methodology201931.5%31.2%31.8%
US New Methodology202032.2%31.8%32.5%
US New Methodology202133.3%33.0%33.7%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters.   [[br]]Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 standard population.[[br]] [[br]]U.S. data does not include U.S. territories, but does include Dist. of Columbia.[[br]] [[br]] Beginning in 2011, BRFSS data include both landline and cell phone respondent data along with a new weighting methodology called iterative proportional fitting, or raking. Comparisons between 2011 and prior years should be made with caution. More details about these changes can be found at: [https://ibis.health.utah.gov/pdf/opha/resource/brfss/RakingImpact2011.pdf].

Data Sources

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, US Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
  • The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Adult Obesity by Age and Sex, Utah, 2021

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Rates shown are crude rates. The overall obesity rate for maies in 2021 was 30.5%, compared to 31.4% for females (not shown). Differences were not significantly different. The overall crude rate for obesity was 30.9% (29.8%-32.1%) in 2021 (not shown in the table).
Males vs. FemalesAge GroupCrude Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 13
Male18-3424.3%21.5%27.3%
Male35-4935.7%32.6%38.9%
Male50-6436.8%33.5%40.3%
Male65+29.3%26.2%32.6%
Female17 or Under**
Female18-3426.3%23.1%29.9%
Female35-4936.3%33.0%39.7%
Female50-6437.0%33.5%40.7%
Female65+28.1%25.2%31.3%
Total18-3425.2%23.1%27.5%
Total35-4936.0%33.7%38.3%
Total50-6436.9%34.5%39.4%
Total65+28.7%26.5%30.9%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Adult Obesity by Local Health District, Utah, 2020 & 2021

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confidence limits

Southeast Utah had the highest obesity rate, folllowed closely by Tooele County.
Local Health DistrictAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 14
Bear River29.2%26.2%32.5%
Central30.1%26.6%34.0%
Davis County33.7%31.0%36.4%
Salt Lake County30.3%28.9%31.8%
San Juan34.5%26.3%43.7%
Southeast36.9%31.5%42.6%
Southwest30.4%27.2%33.8%
Summit16.4%12.4%21.3%
Tooele35.6%31.2%40.3%
TriCounty34.2%30.7%37.8%
Utah County29.1%27.3%30.9%
Wasatch26.1%20.8%32.3%
Weber-Morgan33.1%30.3%36.1%
State of Utah30.6%29.8%31.4%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters.   [[br]] [[br]] Percentages have been age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. [[br]]

Data Sources

  • The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)
  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, US Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).


Adult Obesity by Utah Small Area, 2017-2021

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confidence limits

There was considerable variation in the rates of obesity by Utah Small Area. The gap between the areas with the lowest rate and the highest rate was dramatic. Park City had the lowest rate of obesity (8.7%) of all the Utah Small Areas. San Juan County (Other) had the highest rate of obesity (44.0%). Note that the state rate represents the rate for the combined five-year period.
Utah Small AreasAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 100
Brigham City34.4%29.1%40.1%
Box Elder Co (Other) V235.5%28.3%43.4%
Tremonton36.7%30.1%43.7%
Logan V225.6%22.2%29.4%
North Logan28.8%23.2%35.2%
Cache (Other)/Rich (All) V222.9%18.7%27.7%
Hyrum27.3%19.6%36.7%
Smithfield29.3%23.0%36.4%
Ben Lomond34.3%30.5%38.2%
Weber County (East)27.0%23.1%31.3%
Morgan County29.1%21.5%38.1%
Ogden (Downtown)33.2%28.7%38.0%
South Ogden31.1%26.5%36.0%
Roy/Hooper36.8%32.4%41.4%
Riverdale33.3%28.0%39.1%
Clearfield Area/Hooper39.4%35.4%43.5%
Layton/South Weber28.6%25.6%31.8%
Kaysville/Fruit Heights25.5%21.3%30.2%
Syracuse35.9%30.5%41.6%
Centerville34.0%26.7%42.1%
Farmington24.0%18.6%30.4%
North Salt Lake27.0%20.8%34.3%
Woods Cross/West Bountiful35.8%28.0%44.4%
Bountiful26.4%22.4%30.9%
SLC (Rose Park)29.6%24.5%35.3%
SLC (Avenues)12.4%8.8%17.3%
SLC (Foothill/East Bench)12.2%8.7%17.0%
Magna39.9%34.3%45.8%
SLC (Glendale) V237.5%30.4%45.1%
West Valley (Center)37.2%32.4%42.2%
West Valley (West) V239.0%32.9%45.6%
West Valley (East) V238.0%33.3%42.9%
SLC (Downtown) V223.0%18.8%28.0%
SLC (Southeast Liberty)13.8%9.7%19.3%
South Salt Lake29.7%24.1%35.8%
SLC (Sugar House)22.8%18.9%27.2%
Millcreek (South)19.8%15.2%25.5%
Millcreek (East)17.7%13.2%23.4%
Holladay V222.5%16.9%29.2%
Cottonwood16.7%13.2%20.9%
Kearns V239.1%33.7%44.7%
Taylorsville (E)/Murray (W)35.7%31.0%40.7%
Taylorsville (West)35.9%30.8%41.4%
Murray29.7%24.8%35.1%
Midvale34.5%29.2%40.2%
West Jordan (Northeast) V231.4%26.6%36.8%
West Jordan (Southeast)33.1%28.6%38.1%
West Jordan (W)/Copperton31.5%26.8%36.6%
South Jordan V224.4%20.4%28.9%
Daybreak24.3%19.5%29.8%
Sandy (West)26.9%21.8%32.6%
Sandy (Center) V231.7%26.3%37.6%
Sandy (Northeast)19.1%14.5%24.7%
Sandy (Southeast)21.5%16.9%27.0%
Draper22.2%17.9%27.2%
Riverton/Bluffdale27.4%23.5%31.7%
Herriman32.3%27.8%37.1%
Tooele County (Other)32.0%26.7%37.8%
Tooele Valley38.3%35.1%41.6%
Eagle Mountain/Cedar Valley34.7%29.1%40.8%
Lehi27.7%24.3%31.3%
Saratoga Springs28.6%23.4%34.4%
American Fork27.9%24.0%32.1%
Alpine17.4%11.4%25.5%
Pleasant Grove/Lindon28.7%25.2%32.5%
Orem (North)30.6%26.1%35.5%
Orem (West)27.6%23.4%32.2%
Orem (East)23.7%18.9%29.3%
Provo/BYU22.3%18.4%26.8%
Provo (West City Center)32.2%27.3%37.6%
Provo (East City Center)27.8%21.3%35.5%
Salem City27.6%20.5%36.1%
Spanish Fork29.3%25.4%33.6%
Springville33.6%28.9%38.7%
Mapleton25.7%19.5%33.0%
Utah County (South) V234.6%28.0%41.9%
Payson29.5%24.6%34.9%
Park City8.7%6.0%12.5%
Summit County (East)23.2%18.4%28.8%
Wasatch County24.8%21.4%28.6%
Daggett and Uintah County36.4%33.6%39.3%
Duchesne County29.0%25.8%32.5%
Nephi/Mona28.1%21.6%35.7%
Delta/Fillmore28.7%23.2%35.0%
Sanpete Valley28.2%23.8%33.0%
Central (Other)29.7%25.7%34.0%
Richfield/Monroe/Salina36.7%31.5%42.1%
Carbon County37.5%33.0%42.2%
Emery County33.8%28.4%39.7%
Grand County22.7%16.9%29.6%
Blanding/Monticello33.1%27.6%39.0%
San Juan County (Other)44.0%34.8%53.6%
St. George29.8%26.6%33.2%
Washington Co (Other) V224.6%17.7%33.1%
Washington City23.9%18.6%30.3%
Hurricane/La Verkin29.9%23.9%36.7%
Ivins/Santa Clara30.7%22.2%40.6%
Cedar City30.0%25.6%34.8%
Southwest LHD (Other)26.2%21.1%32.1%
State of Utah29.1%28.6%29.6%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters.   [[br]] [[br]] Percentages have been age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. [[br]] [[br]]A description of the Utah Small Areas and details about Small Area reclassification may be found on the Methodology and Guidelines page at: [https://ibis.health.utah.gov/resource/Guidelines.html].

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Adult Obesity by Ethnicity, Utah, 2021

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confidence limits

Adults who are Hispanic or Latino have statistically significantly higher rates of obesity than adults who are non-Hispanic.
Hispanic EthnicityAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 3
Hispanic/Latino35.8%32.1%39.8%
Non-Hispanic/Latino31.0%29.7%32.2%
All Ethnicities31.8%30.6%32.9%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters.   [[br]] [[br]] Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Adult Obesity by Race, Utah, 2019-2021

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confidence limits

The highest rate of obesity was seen for Pacific Islander adults (54.3%) lowest rate was reported for Asian adults (9.6%).
RaceAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 7
American Indian/Alaska Native38.0%32.6%43.7%
Asian9.6%6.8%13.3%
Black, African American32.6%26.3%39.6%
Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander54.3%45.1%63.2%
White30.1%29.4%30.8%
Two or More Races33.0%30.0%36.2%
All Races30.2%29.6%30.9%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters.   [[br]] [[br]] Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 standard population with three age groups.[[br]] [[br]]Three years of data were combined to improve reliability of the estimates.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Adult Obesity by Education (Ages 25+), Utah, 2021

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confidence limits

Data were limited to adults aged 25 or older. Adults with a college degree or higher had the lowest rate of obesity of any of the education groups.
Education LevelAge-adjusted Percentage of Adults 25+Lower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 5
Less Than High School38.3%32.2%44.8%
H.S. Grad or G.E.D.37.5%34.7%40.3%
Some Post High School37.3%35.0%39.6%
College Graduate27.5%25.8%29.2%
Total34.0%32.7%35.3%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters.   [[br]] [[br]] Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Adult Obesity by Income, Utah, 2021

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confidence limits

Lower rates of obesity are seen for adults in households with annal incomes of $75,000 or higher.
Income CategoryAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 5
<$25,00033.1%28.9%37.6%
$25,000-$49,99937.6%34.7%40.6%
$50,000-$74,99935.7%32.7%38.9%
$75,000+28.4%26.7%30.2%
Total31.8%30.6%32.9%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters.   [[br]] [[br]] Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Adult Obesity by Disability, Utah, 2020-2021

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Disability can make it more challenging to be active, eat well, and control weight (see [https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/obesity.html]). The highest rates of obesity is seen for adults with mobility disabilities.
Disability TypeAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 7
Cognitive disability36.5%34.0%39.2%
Mobility disability48.3%44.2%52.4%
Self-care disability41.6%34.8%48.8%
Independent living disability43.3%39.5%47.2%
Difficulty seeing or blind40.0%34.3%46.0%
Difficulty hearing or deaf34.1%29.4%39.1%
No disability28.1%27.2%29.0%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters.   Rates are age-adjusted.Two years of data were combined to increase reliability of the estimates.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

References and Community Resources

The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion provides consumer information at [https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/index.html]. NHLBI Obesity Education Initiative - [https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/science/obesity-nutrition-and-physical-activity] Trust for America's Health - [https://www.tfah.org/]

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) WONDER Database, a system for disseminating public health data and information.
  • United States Census Bureau data dashboard.
  • Utah healthy Places Index, evidence-based and peer-reviewed tool, supports efforts to prioritize equitable community investments, develop critical programs and policies across the state, and much more.
  • County Health Rankings
  • Kaiser Family Foundation's StateHealthFacts.org
  • Medical literature can be queried at PubMed library.



Page Content Updated On 10/31/2022, Published on 12/20/2022
The information provided above is from the Utah Department of Health and Human Services IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Thu, 30 May 2024 14:04:19 from Utah Department of Health and Human Services, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Tue, 20 Dec 2022 15:38:34 MST