Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content

Utah Air Quality

To see current air quality conditions in Utah, visit the Air Quality Index.

Air quality measures how much pollution is in the air. Air pollutants are any biological, physical, or chemical particles found in ambient air that are harmful to the environment and human health. Pollutants can come from many everyday human activities like driving a car and using wood-burning fireplaces. They can also come from environmental sources like wildfires and dust storms. The greatest contributors to poor air quality are emissions and by-products of industrial processes from factories, refineries, and power plants.

Why it's important

For more information on the importance of air quality visit the Utah EPHT website.

Who is at risk

Air pollution affects everyone, but certain people are more susceptible to its effects. Sensitive populations include people with lung or heart issues, young children, and older adults.

How it is tracked

The Utah Environmental Public Health Tracking Network receives air quality data from the Air Quality Division of the Utah Department of Environmental Quality and from the Environmental Protection Agency.

What is known

In 2020, 11 Utah counties had at least 1 day where the 8-hour average ozone concentration was above the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. Data on ozone levels are only available where air monitors exist and mainly monitor ozone during the summer months. In 2019, 75% of days monitored for the Air Quality Index were rated "good." Twenty-three percent of days monitored were considered moderate. There were also 63 days where the Air Quality Index was unhealthy for sensitive groups, however, this accounts for only 1% of days monitored.

Who is at risk and how to reduce it

Air pollution affects everyone, but certain people are more susceptible to its effects. Sensitive populations include people with lung or heart issues, young children, and older adults. Even though we may assume that our individual choices do not affect air quality, they do. Reducing air pollution and improving air quality is everybody's responsibility:
  • Conserve energy by turning off lights and appliances when you're not using them
  • Recycle paper, plastic, glass bottles, cardboard, and aluminium cans
  • Shop with a canvas bag and avoid using paper and plastic bags
  • Plan your trips with your automobile
  • Instead of using your car, use public transportation, ride a bike, or walk

For more suggestions, please visit these websites for more ideas:

How it's tracked

The Utah Environmental Public Health Tracking Network receives air quality data from the Air Quality Division of the Utah Department of Environmental Quality and from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Air Quality Conditions

Resources

Program Websites

Utah Health Assessments Involving Air Quality

The links listed below redirect you to health assessments that have been conducted in Utah that are relevant to air quality. The Utah APPLETREE program at the Utah Department of Health is responsible for evaluating and responding to environmental public health issues in Utah. For more information, please visit the Utah APPLETREE website.

The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Wed, 05 October 2022 19:04:13 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Fri, 2 Sep 2022 09:06:58 MDT