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PHOM Indicator Profile Report of Overweight or Obese

Why Is This Important?

Being overweight increases the risk of many chronic diseases, including heart disease, stroke, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis, and some cancers. In 2020, more than sixty percent (62.4% ;CI 61.1%--63.6%) of Utah adults were overweight or obese. Note that this estimat is for the crude rate. Most of the estimates shown in the graphs for this indicator use age-adjusted rates. The age-adjusted rate for 2020 was 63.8% (62.7%-65.0%) for Utah adults.

Overweight or Obese by Year, Utah and U.S., 1989-2020

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confidence limits
In 2020, the overweight or obesity rate in Utah continued to be slightly lower than the U.S. rate, 63.8% vs. 66.6%, respecitvely.

Data Sources

  • Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health
  • U.S. Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), Division of Behavioral Surveillance, CDC Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services

Data Notes

Overweight or obese is defined as a BMI of 25 or more. BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters. In 2016, Utah BRFSS modified its methodology for age adjustment for increased precision. With this change Utah is consistent with both the U.S. and other states using IBIS. Data has been updated from 2011 onward in all chart views to reflect this change.   [[br]] [[br]] In 2011, the BRFSS changed its methodology from a landline only sample and weighting based on post-stratification to a landline/cell phone sample and raking as the weighting methodology. Raking accounts for variables such as income, education, marital status, and home ownership during weighting and has the potential to more accurately reflect the population distribution. [[br]] [[br]] Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 standard population. [[br]] [[br]] Note: At the time of this update, the BRFSS U.S. dataset did not include an age variable but did include five age categories up to age 80+ (vs. the typical weighting scheme that includes 85+). Comparisons with both weighting schemes were compared using Utah data, and the difference was about 1/100 of a percentage point.

Risk Factors

Behaviors such as engaging in physical activity and having a healthy diet, can have a significant impact on reducing the risk of being overweight or obese (see Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Overweight & Obesity: Adult Obesity Causes & Consequences. [https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/adult/causes.html]).

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of adults who were overweight or obese increased steadily over the past decades. In Utah, the age-adjusted percentage of overweight or obese individuals increased from 39.7% in 1989 to 63.8% in 2020 (age-adjusted).

What Is Being Done?

The Utah Department of Health?s, Healthy Environments Active Living program plays a key role in improving the health of residents in the state of Utah. The program was formed in July 2013 (as EPICC), through a new funding opportunity from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that allowed for the merging of three previously existing programs: the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program, the Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, and the Physical Activity, Nutrition and Obesity Program, as well as the addition of a school health program. The Healthy Environments Active Living Program was recently restructured as part of this strategic planning process and the new program model focuses on working together with staff and partners to address the social determinants of health while advancing health equity and increasing policy, systems and environment changes. HEAL works: In Schools:[[br]] 1) Schools are encouraged to adopt the Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. This framework encourages students to be physically active for 60 minutes a day through school, home, and community activities.[[br]] 2) Height and weight trends are being tracked in a sample of elementary students to monitor Utah students.[[br]] 3) Action for Healthy Kids brings partners together to improve nutrition and physical activity environments in Utah's schools by implementing the school-based state plan strategies, working with local school boards to improve or develop policies for nutritious foods in schools. This includes recommendations for healthy vending options. In Worksites:[[br]] 1) The Utah Council for Worksite Health Promotion recognizes businesses that offer employee fitness and health promotion programs.[[br]] 2) HEAL offers a training on developing worksite wellness programs called Work@Health. HEAL also partners with local health departments to encourage worksites to complete the CDC Scorecard and participate in yearly health risk assessment for their employees. HEAL provides toolkits and other resources for employers interested in implementing wellness programs through the [http://heal.health.utah.gov heal.health.utah.gov] website: [https://heal.health.utah.gov/worksite-wellness/] In Communities:[[br]] 1) Local health departments (LHDs) receive federal funding to partner with schools, worksites, and other community based organizations to increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables through Eat Well Utah, farmers markets and retail stores. LHDs also work with cities within their jurisdictions to create a built environment that encourages physical activity. In Healthcare:[[br]] 1) HEAL works with health care systems to establish community clinical linkages to support individuals at risk for or diagnosed with diabetes or hypertension to engage in lifestyle change programs such as chronic disease self-management and diabetes prevention programs. In Childcare:[[br]] 1) Ten local health departments statewide have implemented the TOP Star program, which aims to improve the nutrition, physical activity, and breastfeeding environments and achieve best practice in child care centers and homes.[[br]] 2) HEAL works with state and local partners through the Childcare Obesity Prevention workgroup to implement policy and systems changes in early care and education across agencies statewide.

Healthy People Objective: Increase the proportion of adults who are at a healthy weight

U.S. Target: 33.9 percent

Date Indicator Content Last Updated: 10/27/2021


Other Views

The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Mon, 26 September 2022 12:15:32 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Fri, 18 Feb 2022 14:16:55 MST