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Complete Health Indicator Report of Drinking Water: TCE (Trichloroethene)

Definition

__Mean Trichloroethene Levels for Utah__ [[br]] 1) Yearly distribution of number of community water systems (CWS) by mean trichloroethene (TCE) concentration [[br]] 2) Yearly distribution of number of people served by CWS by mean TCE concentration __Maximum Trichloroethene Levels for Utah__ [[br]] 3) Yearly distribution of number of CWS by maximum TCE concentration [[br]] 4) Yearly distribution of number of people served by CWS by maximum TCE concentration

Numerator

1) Count of community water systems categorized by mean TCE concentration for each year reported (cut-points: <=5, >5 ug/L TCE, Not Detected) 2) Number of people served by community water systems categorized by mean TCE concentration for each year reported (cut-points: <=5, >5 ug/L TCE, Not Detected) 3) Count of community water systems categorized by maximum TCE concentration for each year reported (cut-points: <=5, >5 ug/L TCE, Not Detected) 4) Number of people served by community water systems categorized by maximum TCE concentration for each year reported (cut-points: <=5, >5 ug/L TCE, Not Detected)

Denominator

Not applicable. There are no rate measures in this indicator.

Data Interpretation Issues

A community water system (CWS) is a public water system which serves at least 15 service connections used by year-round residents or regularly serves at least 25 year-round residents. These calculations include all available data which varies by year and water system. Population data for each community water system are estimates based on number of connections. Inconsistent outliers and other data errors were not included in calculations in order to provide a more accurate representation of water quality. Data reported to other sources, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), may differ slightly. This data does not include information about private water sources such as well water or tribal water systems. The current measures are derived for CWS only. Private wells may be another source of population exposure to TCE. Transient non-community water systems, which are regulated by EPA, also may be an important source of TCE exposure. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people. Due to errors in estimating populations, the measures may overestimate or underestimate the number of affected people. (From the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network [NEPHTN] Nationally Consistent Data and Measures [NCDM] TCE indicator document, version 5) Ground water systems may have multiple wells with different TCE concentrations that serve different parts of the population. Compliance samples are taken at each entry point to the distribution system. In systems with separate wells serving some branches or sections of the distribution system, the system mean would tend to underestimate the TCE concentration of people served by wells with higher TCE concentrations. Exposure may be higher or lower than estimated if data from multiple entry points for water with different TCE levels are averaged to estimate levels for the CWS. (From the NEPHTN NCDM TCE indicator document, version 5)

Why Is This Important?

People drink and use water every day. The majority of Americans are provided with high quality drinking water. About 90% of people in the U.S. get their water from a community water system versus a smaller water supply, such as a household well. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets regulations for treating and monitoring drinking water delivered by community water systems. Currently, there are water quality standards and monitoring requirements for over 90 contaminants. Drinking water protection programs play a critical role in ensuring high quality drinking water and protecting the public's health. Because people drink and use water every day, contaminants in drinking water have the potential to affect many people. The number of people served by a community water system varies from as low as 25 to hundreds of thousands. Community water systems in the U.S. provide among the highest quality drinking water in the world. However, some contaminants are present at low levels, and it is still possible that drinking water can become contaminated at higher levels. If a person is exposed to a high enough level of a contaminant, they may become ill. Trichloroethene (TCE) is a volatile halogenated short-chain hydrocarbon. TCE is used primarily as an industrial degreaser, solvent, and in the synthesis of other chemicals. In the past, it was used in dry cleaning, food processing, household cleaners, and as a general anesthetic. TCE is produced and used in high volumes in the U.S. and has been detected in urban and ambient air and occasionally soils and drinking water most likely contaminated by industrial discharge (Moran et al., 2007; Rowe et al., 2007). Because of its volatility, this solvent does not persist in the soil or water following the discontinuation of contamination. (From the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network [NEPHTN] Nationally Consistent Data and Measures [NCDM] TCE indicator document, version 5) TCE does not occur naturally in the environment. However, it has been found in underground water sources and many surface waters as a result of the manufacture, use, and disposal of the chemical. Drinking or breathing high levels of TCE may cause nervous system effects, liver and lung damage, abnormal heartbeat, coma, and possibly death (ATSDR, 2003). Inhalation is the most common exposure route for the general population including indoor sources from paints, adhesives, and cleaning solutions. Volatilization from contaminated water (e.g., shower water) as well as the use of household products containing this solvent can result in higher indoor air concentrations than outdoor (ATSDR, 1997b; Martin et al., 2005). (Modified from the NEPHTN NCDM TCE indicator document, version 5)


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Yearly Distribution of Number of Community Water Systems (CWS) by Mean TCE (trichloroethene) Concentration, Utah, 1999-2018

::chart - missing::

TCE Concentration (ug/L)YearNumber of CWS
Record Count: 114
<=519990
<=520000
<=520011
<=520020
<=520030
<=520040
<=520050
<=520061
<=520070
<=520080
<=520090
<=520100
<=520111
<=520120
<=520130
<=520140
<=520152
<=520160
<=520170
<=520180
>519990
>520000
>520010
>520020
>520030
>520040
>520050
>520060
>520070
>520080
>520090
>520100
>520110
>520120
>520130
>520140
>520150
>520160
>520170
>520180
Not Detected19996
Not Detected2000213
Not Detected2001220
Not Detected2002252
Not Detected2003195
Not Detected2004142
Not Detected2005165
Not Detected2006162
Not Detected2007151
Not Detected2008157
Not Detected2009173
Not Detected2010214
Not Detected2011164
Not Detected2012160
Not Detected2013270
Not Detected2014147
Not Detected2015139
Not Detected2016292
Not Detected2017149
Not Detected2018158

Data Source

Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Drinking Water, Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS)


Yearly Distribution of People Served by Community Water Systems (CWS) by Mean TCE (trichloroethene) Concentration, Utah, 1999-2018

::chart - missing::

TCE Concentration (ug/L)YearNumber of People Served by CWS
Record Count: 115
<=519990
<=520000
<=520010
<=5200216,000
<=520030
<=520040
<=520050
<=520060
<=5200737,500
<=520080
<=520090
<=520100
<=520110
<=5201211,900
<=520130
<=520140
<=520150
<=52016334,506
<=520170
<=520180
<=520190
>519990
>520000
>520010
>520020
>520030
>520040
>520050
>520060
>520070
>520080
>520090
>520100
>520110
>520120
>520130
>520140
>520150
>520160
>520170
>520180
Not Detected199910,315
Not Detected20001,859,135
Not Detected20011,989,281
Not Detected20022,116,921
Not Detected20031,947,011
Not Detected20041,799,502
Not Detected20051,847,274
Not Detected20061,745,179
Not Detected20071,815,178
Not Detected20081,676,135
Not Detected20091,828,934
Not Detected20101,911,502
Not Detected20111,903,030
Not Detected20121,810,958
Not Detected20132,069,286
Not Detected20142,924,118
Not Detected20152,952,271
Not Detected20162,507,700
Not Detected20173,087,945
Not Detected20181,976,776

Data Source

Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Drinking Water, Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS)


Yearly Distribution of Number of Community Water Systems (CWS) by Maximum TCE (trichloroethene) Concentration, Utah, 1999-2018

::chart - missing::

TCE Concentration (ug/L)YearNumber of CWS
Record Count: 114
<=519990
<=520000
<=520011
<=520020
<=520030
<=520040
<=520050
<=520061
<=520070
<=520080
<=520090
<=520100
<=520111
<=520120
<=520130
<=520140
<=520152
<=520160
<=520170
<=520180
>519990
>520000
>520010
>520020
>520030
>520040
>520050
>520060
>520070
>520080
>520090
>520100
>520110
>520120
>520130
>520140
>520150
>520160
>520170
>520180
Not Detected19996
Not Detected2000213
Not Detected2001220
Not Detected2002252
Not Detected2003195
Not Detected2004142
Not Detected2005165
Not Detected2006162
Not Detected2007151
Not Detected2008157
Not Detected2009173
Not Detected2010214
Not Detected2011164
Not Detected2012160
Not Detected2013270
Not Detected2014147
Not Detected2015139
Not Detected2016292
Not Detected2017149
Not Detected2018158

Data Source

Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Drinking Water, Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS)


Yearly Distribution of People Served by Community Water Systems (CWS) by Maximum TCE (trichloroethene) Concentration, Utah, 1999-2018

::chart - missing::

TCE Concentration (ug/L)YearNumber of People Served by CWS
Record Count: 105
<=519990
<=520000
<=5200116,000
<=520020
<=520030
<=520040
<=520050
<=5200637,500
<=520070
<=520080
<=520090
<=520100
<=5201111,900
<=520120
<=520130
<=520140
<=52015334,506
<=520160
<=520170
<=520180
>519990
>520000
>520010
>520020
>520030
>520040
>520050
>520060
>520070
>520080
>520090
>520100
>520110
>520120
>520130
>520140
>520150
>520160
>520170
>520180
Not Detected199910,315
Not Detected20001,859,135
Not Detected20011,989,281
Not Detected20022,116,921
Not Detected20031,947,011
Not Detected20041,799,502
Not Detected20051,847,274
Not Detected20061,745,179
Not Detected20071,815,178
Not Detected20081,676,135
Not Detected20091,828,934
Not Detected20101,911,502
Not Detected20111,903,030
Not Detected20121,810,958
Not Detected20132,069,286
Not Detected20142,924,118
Not Detected20152,952,271
Not Detected20162,507,700
Not Detected20173,087,945
Not Detected20181,976,776

Data Source

Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Drinking Water, Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS)

References and Community Resources

Utah Department of Environmental Quality[[br]] [http://www.drinkingwater.utah.gov] U.S. Environmental Protection Agency[[br]] [http://water.epa.gov/drink] Utah Environmental Public Health Tracking Program[[br]] [http://epht.health.utah.gov/epht-view/topic/DrinkingWater.html] National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program[[br]] [http://www.cdc.gov/ephtracking] __Citations__:[[br]] Moran MJ, Zogorski JS, Squillace PJ. Chlorinated solvents in groundwater of the United States. Environ Sci Technol 2007;41:74-81. Rowe BL, Toccalino PL, Moran MJ, Zogorski JS, Price CV. Occurrence and potential human-health relevance of volatile organic compounds in drinking water from domestic wells in the United States. Environ Health Perspect 2007;115(11):1539-1546. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). ToxFAQs? for Trichloroethylene (TCE), July 2003. Available at: [http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/tf.asp?id=172&tid=30] Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). Toxicological profile for trichloroethylene update. 1997b [online]. Available at URL: [http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/ tp19.html]. 4/22/09 Martin SA, Simmons MB, Ortiz-Serrano M, Kendrick C, Gallo A, Campbell J, et al. Environmental exposure of a community to airborne trichloroethylene. Arch Environ Occup Health 2005;60(6):341-316.

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 09/19/2019, Published on 11/13/2019
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Wed, 25 November 2020 18:52:08 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Wed, 13 Nov 2019 15:03:03 MST