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PHOM Indicator Profile Report of Colorectal Cancer Screening

Why Is This Important?

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. and Utah. Screening for this cancer is important as deaths can be substantially reduced when precancerous polyps are detected early and removed. The chance of surviving colorectal cancer exceeds 90% when the cancer is diagnosed before it has extended beyond the intestinal wall ([http://www.cancer.org]).

Recommended Colon Cancer Screening, Utah and U.S., 2010-2016

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confidence limits
[[br]]*National BRFSS data is published in 5 year age groupings and query by age group 50-75 is not possible, therefore ages 50-74 is used instead. Utah data is also presented for adults ages 50-74 for better comparison to national rates.

Data Sources

  • Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health
  • U.S. Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), Division of Behavioral Surveillance, CDC Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services

Data Notes

[[br]]*National BRFSS data is published in 5 year age groupings and query by age group 50-75 is not possible, therefore ages 50-74 is used instead. Utah data is also presented for adults ages 50-74 for better comparison to national rates. Due to changes in survey methodology and changes in U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines, only data after 2010 is presented.

Risk Factors

Colorectal cancer risk increases with age, inflammatory bowel disease, a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, and certain hereditary syndromes. A diet high in fat and low in fiber, lack of regular physical activity, obesity, excessive alcohol consumption, and smoking are also thought to increase risk. A diet high in fruits and vegetables, hormone replacement therapy in post-menopausal women, and aspirin use may reduce colorectal cancer risk.

How Are We Doing?

Utah rates of recommended colorectal cancer screening among adults aged 50-75 have risen significantly in the past 5 years from 63.5 percent in 2010 to 72.7 in 2016. In 2016, Hispanic adults aged 50-75 were significantly less likely (50.1 percent) than non-Hispanic adults (74.8 percent) to report having recommended colorectal cancer screening. Among Utah Small Areas, in 2016 Cottonwood had the highest rate of adults ages 50-75 having had recommended colorectal cancer screening (83.4 percent) and San Juan County had the lowest at 34.9 percent.

What Is Being Done?

Screening for colorectal cancer has recently been identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a priority public health issue. The Utah Cancer Control Program (UCCP) monitors the use of colorectal cancer screening tests by Utahns through the statewide Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), which is conducted annually.

Healthy People Objective: Increase the proportion of adults who receive a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines

U.S. Target: 70.5 percent
State Target: 80 percent among adults aged 50-75

Date Indicator Content Last Updated: 12/20/2017


Other Views

The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sat, 20 January 2018 11:38:49 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Wed, 20 Dec 2017 12:09:06 MST