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Health Indicator Report of Utah Population Characteristics: Household Income

Income is strongly related to health status. Low-income persons tend to have poorer health status, in part because they cannot always afford good health care. However, some people have low income levels because chronic mental or physical illness limits their ability to complete educational goals and earn a good income.

Median Annual Household Income in Current Dollars and Inflation-adjusted, Utah and U.S., 1984-2015

Notes

Legacy questions - data from income questions consistent with previous years[[br]] Redesigned questions - data from redesigned questions In order to accurately compare income over time, users should adjust the measures for changes in cost of living. The Census Bureau uses the Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) Consumer Price Index (CPI-U) to adjust for changes in the cost of living. Current dollars is a term describing income in the year in which a person, household, or family receives it (unadjusted for inflation). Upper and lower limits are calculated to 90% confidence intervals.

Data Sources

  • U.S. Current Population Survey
  • U.S. Bureau of the Census

Definition

Median annual household income is the income level at which half of all households' income is lower, and half of all households' income is higher.

Numerator

Not applicable.

Denominator

Not applicable.

How Are We Doing?

Utah's median household income has increased overall since 1984, even after adjusting for inflation. However, there have been short timeframes when the median income decreased or remained fairly level.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Utah's median household income has generally kept pace with that in the U.S., but Utah's households are larger, making per capita income in Utah lower than in the U.S. overall.

What Is Being Done?

The Utah Department of Health has no programs directed specifically at increasing household income levels. However, there are programs such as Medicaid, Primary Care Network, and CHIP (Children's Health Insurance Program) that pay for health care for eligible children and adults.

Available Services

For information on the Medicaid program: [[br]] In the Salt Lake City area, call 801-538-6155.[[br]] In Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Nevada, call toll-free 1-800-662-9651.[[br]] From other states, call 1-801-538-6155.[[br]] Medicaid Customer Service staff are available to take inquiries.[[br]] Or visit the Utah Medicaid website:[[br]] [http://www.health.utah.gov/medicaid/][[br]] [[br]] For information on CHIP and the PCN:[[br]] Call the Health Resource Line: 1-888-222-2542[[br]] Or visit the their websites:[[br]] CHIP: Children's Health Insurance Program (for children 0-18) -[[br]] [http://www.health.state.ut.us/chip][[br]] PCN: Utah Primary Care Network (for low-income adults) -[[br]] [http://www.health.utah.gov/pcn/][[br]] [[br]] Voices for Utah Children is a private, not-for-profit organization that advocates for children. Information about their activities may be found on their website, [http://www.utahchildren.org].
Page Content Updated On 01/05/2017, Published on 01/24/2017
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Thu, 14 December 2017 3:07:30 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Fri, 26 May 2017 10:19:50 MDT