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Health Indicator Report of Colorectal Cancer Screening

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. and Utah. Screening for this cancer is important as deaths can be substantially reduced when precancerous polyps are detected early and removed. The chance of surviving colorectal cancer exceeds 90% when the cancer is diagnosed before it has extended beyond the intestinal wall (www.cancer.org).

Recommended Colon Cancer Screening by Ethnicity, Utah, 2012 and 2013

Notes

Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health

Data Interpretation Issues

The question asked on the BRFSS about colorectal cancer screening has changed over time. In 1993 and 1995, survey respondents were asked whether they had ever had a proctoscopic exam and the length of time since the last exam. In 1997, respondents were asked whether they had ever had a sigmoidoscopy or proctoscopy and the length of time since the last exam. In 1999-2000 respondents were asked whether they had ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy and the length of time since the last exam. From 2001 to present, data has been based on sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy or fecal occult blood testing and the length of time since the last exam. This better matches with current screening recommendations. To reduce bias and more accurately represent population data, the BRFSS has changed survey methodology. In 2010, it began conducting surveys by cellular phone in addition to landline phones. It also adopted "iterative proportional fitting" (raking) as its weighting method.

Definition

The proportion of persons aged 50 or older who reported having recommended colorectal cancer screening (sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy in the past 10 years or having an FOBT (fecal occult blood test) in the last year).

Numerator

The number of respondents aged 50 or older who reported having recommended colorectal cancer screening (sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy in the past 10 years or having an FOBT (fecal occult blood test) in the last year).

Denominator

The total number of survey respondents aged 50 or older excluding those who answered "don't know" or "refused" to the numerator question.

Healthy People Objective C-16:

Increase the proportion of adults who receive a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines
U.S. Target: 70.5 percent
State Target: 70.0 percent

Other Objectives

CSTE Chronic Disease Indicators Similar to HP2020 Objective C-16: Increase the proportion of adults aged 50 years and older who receive a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines. State-Specific Target: Increase the proportion of adults aged 50 years and older who have had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy within the past ten years or an FOBT in the last year to 70.0% in 2020.

How Are We Doing?

Utah rates of recommended colorectal cancer screening (blood stool test within the past year, sigmoidoscopy within the past 5 years and a blood stool test within the past 3 years, or a colonoscopy within the past 10 years) were 70.2 percent in 2012 and 75.4 in 2013. In 2012 and 2013 combined, Hispanic/Latino adults aged 50 and older were significantly less likely than non-Hispanic/Latino adults to report having recommended colorectal cancer screening (63.8 percent of Hispanics compared to 73.6 percent non-Hispanics). Among Utah Small Areas, Sandy (NE) had the highest rate of adults aged 50 and older having had recommended colorectal cancer screening (89.6 percent) and SLC (Glendale) had the lowest at 36.7 percent.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

In 2012, the methodology for assessing recommended screening rates was revised on a state and national level. Due to the differing methodologies, it is not possible to make direct comparisons between 2010 and 2012 numbers. However, current data appears to parallel previously seen trends, with Utah screening rates being comparable to the U.S. average. Nationally, the percentage of adults aged 50 and older having recommended colorectal cancer screening was 67.4 percent in 2012, compared to the Utah screening rate of 70.2 percent.

What Is Being Done?

The 2000 Utah Legislature approved a resolution encouraging private health insurance companies and employers to include insurance coverage for the screening and detection of breast, colorectal, and prostate cancers. In June 2002, the Utah Cancer Control Program (UCCP) received a grant from the CDC to launch a statewide education campaign. In 2009, the UCCP received a CDC grant to begin offering colorectal cancer screenings to low-income and uninsured Utahns. In addition to the screening program, monies were used for educational and promotional activities. Education efforts serve to increase awareness about colorectal cancer and promote screening and early detection for Utahns aged 50 and older. In addition, the Utah Department of Health initiated the Utah Cancer Action Network (UCAN), a statewide partnership whose goal is to reduce the burden of cancer. The mission of the UCAN is to lower cancer incidence and mortality in Utah through collaborative efforts directed toward cancer prevention and control. As a result of this planning process, objectives and strategies have been developed by community partners regarding the early detection of cervical, testicular, prostate, skin, breast, and colorectal cancers as well as the promotion of physical activity, healthy eating habits, and smoking cessation.

Available Services

Please visit the Utah Cancer Control Program website: cancerutah.org

Health Program Information

Screening for colorectal cancer has recently been identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a priority public health issue. The CDC and partners launched a national education campaign, Screen for Life, in March 1999. In June 2002, the Utah Cancer Control Program (UCCP) received a grant from the CDC to launch a statewide education campaign. Since then, additional funds have been awarded annually and public education efforts have continued. Education efforts serve to increase awareness about colorectal cancer and promote screening and early detection for adults aged 50 and older. The UCCP monitors the use of colorectal cancer screening tests by Utahns through the statewide Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), which is conducted annually.
Page Content Updated On 12/10/2014, Published on 03/26/2015
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Content updated: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:46:10 MDT