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Health Indicator Report of Birth Defects: Infant Mortality

Birth defects are the leading cause of infant mortality in Utah and the United States. Utah Birth Defect Network Website[[br]] [http://www.health.utah.gov/birthdefect] Environmental Public Health Tracking Specific Utah Birth Defect Data[[br]] [http://epht.health.utah.gov/epht-view/topic/BirthDefects.html]

Infant Mortality Among Infants with Birth Defects by Race/Ethnicity, Utah, 1999-2012

Notes

*Denominator for this graph is the number of live born infants with birth defects born to Utah residents during the year. Hispanic persons may be of any race.

Data Source

Utah Birth Defect Network

Definition

Infant mortality related to birth defects in live born infants of Utah residents that died within the first year of life.

Numerator

Number of live born infants with major birth defects as reported to the Utah Birth Defect Network (UBDN), born during the year to Utah resident mothers and who died within the first year of life.

Denominator

Number of live born infants with birth defects born to Utah residents during the year.

Healthy People Objective MICH-1.6:

Reduce the rate of infant deaths related to birth defects (all birth defects)
U.S. Target: 1.3 infant deaths per 1,000 live births

How Are We Doing?

The first 28 days of life are critical for babies with a birth defect. Of those babies in Utah with a birth defect that died during their first year of life, most died within the first 28 days of life. From 1999 to 2013 the average number of death per year due to birth defects was 78.4 infant deaths. The infant mortality rate due to birth defects was 1.5 deaths per 1,000 live births. Additional information about infant mortality is available at [http://ibis.health.utah.gov/indicator/view/InfMort.html]

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Utah data is consistent with the general pattern observed in the United States as a whole and in other developed countries, in that birth defects contribute to a substantial proportion (between a quarter and a third) of all infant deaths. Utah has a high birth rate (the highest in the nation) and large family size; on average a family in Utah has a higher chance compared to other states and countries to have and to experience the loss of a child with birth defects.

What Is Being Done?

Surveillance, research, and primary prevention services are keys to reducing infant mortality due to birth defects. For surveillance, UBDN currently contributes to tracking and assessing impact, trends, and disparities related to major structural birth defects overall, and their related mortality. UBDN engages in prevention activities among women and health care providers to promote the use of the B-vitamin folic acid to prevent spina bifida and other neural tube defects. UBDN is a member of the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN), a non-profit organization involving birth defect programs and individuals working at the local, state, and national level to raise awareness for birth defects. [http://nbdpn.org/][[br]]

Available Services

Children with Special Health Care Needs[[br]] Phone (801) 584-8284[[br]] Toll Free (800) 829-8200[[br]] [http://health.utah.gov/cshcn] Division of Medical Genetics[[br]] Department of Pediatrics[[br]] University of Utah Health Sciences Center[[br]] Phone (801) 581-8943 Baby Watch Early Intervention Services[[br]] Phone (801) 273-2998[[br]] Toll Free (800) 961-4226[[br]] [http://www.utahbabywatch.org][[br]] ''Early Intervention services are available for children birth to three years of age with developmental delay or disability. Services include child health assessment, service coordination among providers, occupational and physical therapy, and speech and language therapy.''
Page Content Updated On 11/30/2016, Published on 12/07/2016
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sat, 10 December 2016 15:20:50 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Sun, 13 Dec 2015 11:05:02 MST