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Health Indicator Report of Breast Cancer Screening (Mammography)

Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring cancer in U.S. women (excluding basal and squamous cell skin cancers) and the leading cause of female cancer death in Utah. Deaths from breast cancer can be substantially reduced if the tumor is discovered at an early stage. Mammography is currently the best method for detecting cancer early. Clinical trials have demonstrated that routine screening with mammography can reduce breast cancer deaths by 20% to 30% in women aged 50 to 69 years, and by about 17% in women aged 40 to 49 years. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women 50-74 years of age undergo mammography every one to two years, while the American Cancer Society recommends that women aged 40 or older have an annual mammogram. Women who are at higher than average risk of breast cancer should seek expert medical advice about whether they should begin screening before age 40 and the frequency of that screening. If you are 40 or over, talk to your doctor about which recommendations are best for you.

Mammogram Within the Past Two Years by Income, Utah, 2011-2013

Notes

Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health

Data Interpretation Issues

To reduce bias and more accurately represent population data, the BRFSS has changed survey methodology. In 2010, it began conducting surveys by cellular phone in addition to landline phones. It also adopted "iterative proportional fitting" (raking) as its weighting method. More details about these changes can be found at: http://health.utah.gov/opha/publications/brfss/Raking/Raking%20impact%202011.pdf.

Definition

The proportion of women 40 years or older who reported having a mammogram in the last two years.

Numerator

The number of women 40 years or older who reported having a mammogram in the last two years.

Denominator

The total number of female survey respondents aged 40 or older excluding those who responded "don't know" or "refused" to the numerator question.

Healthy People Objective C-17:

Increase the proportion of women who receive a breast cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines
U.S. Target: 81.1 percent
State Target: 74.14 percent

Other Objectives

CSTE Chronic Disease Indicators

How Are We Doing?

Between 1989 and 2010, the percentage of Utah women aged 40 or older who reported receiving a mammogram within the last two years increased from 51.6 percent to 66.4 percent. To reduce bias and more accurately represent population data, the BRFSS has changed survey methodology in 2010. It began conducting surveys by cellular phone in addition to landline phones. It also adopted "iterative proportional fitting" (raking) as its weighting method. Based on this methodology, Utah's rate 2011-2013 was 66.9 percent (age-adjusted rate). All additional indicator views are based on the new methodology. Between 2011 and 2013, there were no significant differences in mammography screening rates among different ethnic groups. Asians were significantly more likely to be screened (82.2 percent). There were no other significant differences among races. Two local health districts reported significantly higher screening rates than the state (Summit, 75.8 percent and Weber-Morgan, 73.3 percent), while three local health districts reported significantly lower screening rates when compared to the state (Central, 59.9 percent; Southeastern Utah, 58.0 percent; TriCounty, 54.9 percent). After dividing the health districts into Utah Small Areas the prevalence of mammograms ranged from a high of 82.3 percent in Riverdale to a low of 40.5 percent in Grand/San Juan. Between 2011 and 2013, Utah women 40 to 49 years of age were significantly less likely to have received a mammogram within the past two years than older women (59.3 percent vs 72.6 percent among women 50-64 and 70.0 percent among women 65 and over).

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Nationally, the percentage of women aged 40 or older who reported receiving a mammogram in the past two years increased from 55.2 percent in 1989 to 74.9 percent in 2010. Since 1994, the percentage of Utah women aged 40 or older who reported receiving a mammogram has been below the U.S. rate. In 2012, based on new methodology, 67.8 percent of Utah women aged 40 and older had received a mammogram in the last two years compared with 74.0 percent of U.S. women.

What Is Being Done?

The Utah Cancer Control Program (UCCP) in the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) distributes free mammography vouchers to women who receive a clinical breast exam at a UCCP sponsored clinic and meet age and income guidelines. The 2000 Utah legislature approved a resolution encouraging private health insurance companies and employers to include insurance coverage for the screening and detection of breast, colorectal, and prostate cancers. In addition, the UDOH initiated the Utah Cancer Action Network (UCAN), a statewide partnership whose goal is to reduce the burden of cancer. The mission of the UCAN is to lower cancer incidence and mortality in Utah through collaborative efforts directed toward cancer prevention and control. As a result of this planning process, objectives and strategies have been developed by community partners regarding the early detection of cervical, testicular, prostate, skin, breast, and colorectal cancers as well as the promotion of physical activity, healthy eating habits, and smoking cessation.

Available Services

The Utah Cancer Control Program (UCCP) provides free to low cost clinical breast exams and mammograms to women who meet age and income guidelines. Eligible women with abnormal screening exams are offered diagnostic evaluation by participating providers. In addition, the UCCP provides education about the need for early detection and the availability of screening services, performs outreach to eligible women, uses an annual reminder system, collects outcome data, and disseminates information about breast cancer. As of July 1, 2001, the UCCP is able to refer Utah women in need of treatment for breast and cervical cancers and precancerous lesions for full Medicaid benefits. The women must meet all requirements as outlined in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Act.

Health Program Information

The UDOH Utah Cancer Control Program (UCCP) distributes free mammography vouchers to women who receive a clinical breast exam at a UCCP sponsored clinic and meet age and income guidelines. The 2000 Utah legislature approved a resolution encouraging private health insurance companies and employers to include insurance coverage for the screening and detection of breast, colorectal, and prostate cancers.
Page Content Updated On 11/03/2014, Published on 12/02/2014
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sun, 30 August 2015 20:31:25 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:46:08 MDT