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Complete Health Indicator Report of Drug Overdose and Poisoning Incidents

Definition

Poisoning deaths: number of deaths among Utah residents resulting from poisoning (ICD-10 codes X40-X49, X60-X69, X85-X90, Y10-Y19, Y35.2, *U01 [.6-.7]) per 100,000 population. Drug poisoning deaths: number of deaths among Utah residents resulting from drug poisoning (ICD-10 codes X40-44, X60-X64, X85, Y10-Y14) per 100,000 population. Drug poisoning ED visits/hospitalizations: number of incidents (ED visits or hospitalizations) among Utah residents resulting from drug poisoning (ICD-9 codes E850-E858, E950 [.0-.5], E962, E980 [.0-.5]) per 10,000 population. Prescription opioid deaths: number of unintentional and undetermined intent deaths among residents and non-residents resulting from prescription opioids that occurred in Utah.

Numerator

Poisoning deaths: number of deaths among Utah residents resulting from poisoning (ICD-10 codes X40-X49, X60-X69, X85-X90, Y10-Y19, Y35.2, *U01 [.6-.7]). Drug poisoning deaths: number of deaths among Utah residents resulting from drug poisoning (ICD-10 codes X40-X44, X60-X64, X85, Y10-Y14). Drug poisoning ED visits/hospitalizations: number of incidents (ED visits or hospitalizations) among Utah residents resulting from drug poisoning (ICD-9 codes E850-E858, E950 [.0-.5], E962, E980 [.0-.5]). Prescription opioid deaths: number of resident and non-resident unintentional and undetermined prescription opioid deaths that occurred in Utah.

Denominator

Total number of persons in the population of Utah.

Data Interpretation Issues

Poisoning incidents are classified according to ICD codes. ICD stands for the International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death, injury, and disease. These codes are updated approximately every ten years to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. The 9th revision (ICD-9) is used for hospital and emergency department (ED) visits. Poisoning deaths are defined by ICD-10 codes X40-X49 (unintentional), X60-X69 (suicide), X85-X90, *U01 (.6-.7) (homicide), Y10-Y19 (undetermined), and Y35.2 (other). Drug poisoning deaths are a subset of poisoning deaths and are defined by ICD-10 codes X40-44 (unintentional), X60-X64 (suicide), X85 (homicide), and Y10-Y14 (undetermined). ED and hospitalization drug poisoning incidents are defined by ICD-9 codes E850-E858, E950 (.0-.5), E962, E980 (.0-.5). Prescription opioid deaths are identified using data from the Office of the Medical Examiner in the Utah Violent Death Reporting System.

Why Is This Important?

In 2002 the age-adjusted rate of drug poisoning deaths (14.0 per 100,000 population) surpassed the rate of motor vehicle crash (MVC) deaths (13.5 per 100,000 population) in Utah. Until this time, motor vehicle crashes had been responsible for more lives lost than any other cause of injury. By 2013, the age-adjusted death rate from drug poisonings (21.7 per 100,000 population) was more than three times as high as it was from MVC deaths (7.1 per 100,000 population). Prescription pain medications are responsible for many of the drug poisoning deaths in Utah.

Healthy People Objective IVP-9.1:

Prevent an increase in the rate of poisoning deaths: All persons
U.S. Target: 13.1 deaths per 100,000 population
State Target: 12.9 per 100,000 population

Other Objectives

Healthy People 2020 Objective IVP-9.1: Prevent an increase in the rate of poisoning deaths: All persons -U.S. Target: 13.1 deaths per 100,000 population -Utah Target: 12.9 deaths per 100,000 population Healthy People 2020 Objective IVP-9.2: Prevent an increase in the rate of poisoning deaths: Persons aged 35 to 54 years -U.S. Target: 25.5 deaths per 100,000 population -Utah Target: 23.2 deaths per 100,000 population Healthy People 2020 Objective IVP-9.3: Prevent an increase in the rate of poisoning deaths: Unintentional or undetermined intent among all persons -U.S. Target: 11.1 deaths per 100,000 population -Utah Target: 9.7 deaths per 100,000 population Healthy People 2020 Objective IVP-9.4 Prevent an increase in the rate of poisoning deaths: Unintentional or undetermined intent among persons aged 35 to 54 years -U.S. Target: 21.6 deaths per 100,000 population -Utah Target: 34.9/100,000 population (prevent an increase in the 2010 crude rate) Healthy People 2020 Objective IVP-10: Prevent an increase in the rate of nonfatal poisonings -U.S. Target: 304.4 nonfatal poisonings per 100,000 population -Utah Target: 291.5 nonfatal poisonings per 100,000 population

How Are We Doing?

Utah has seen a 4% decrease in the age-adjusted drug poisoning death rate from 2012 (22.6 per 100,000 population) to 2013 (21.7 per 100,000 population). Prescription pain medications underlie many Utah poisoning deaths. In 2013, 23.8% of Utah poisoning deaths were of undetermined intent, 14.0% were self-inflicted, and 62.0% were unintentional. From 2011 to 2013, males had a significantly higher drug poisoning death rate compared to females. Utahns between 25-64 years of age were significantly higher than the state rate of 19.5 per 100,000 population. Males and females had the highest rates in the 45-54 year old age group. For ages 18-34, male drug poisoning death rates were significantly higher than female drug poisoning death rates. Children infrequently require hospitalization for the ingestion of poison, but 1 to 4 year-olds had significantly higher drug poisoning emergency department (ED) visits rates (38.4 per 10,000 population), along with 15-24 year olds (28.2 per 10,000 population), and 25-34 year olds (21.2 per 10,000 population) compared to the state (17.3 per 10,000 population) in 2010-2012.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

From 2010 to 2013, the U.S. age-adjusted rate of drug poisoning deaths from all intents was 13.1 per 100,000 population. During this same time period, Utah's age-adjusted rate of drug poisoning deaths was significantly higher at 20.3 per 100,000 population. Data Source: NCHS Vital Statistics System for numbers of death. Bureau of Census for population estimates.

What Is Being Done?

In July 2007, the Utah State Legislature passed House Bill 137 appropriating funding to the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) to establish a program to reduce deaths and other harm from prescription opiates. Since 2007, the Utah Department of Health launched a media campaign, Use Only As Directed, to educate the public about how to use prescription pain medication safely (visit useonlyasdirected.org for more information). UDOH also launched a statewide provider education intervention where physicians have the opportunity to receive CMEs for participation in small and large group presentations. In 2009, the Utah Pharmaceutical Drug Crime Project was established to further efforts to reduce prescription drug overdose deaths. This project works with law enforcement and other organizations on initiatives such as the National Take Back Days, which collect thousands of pounds of unused medications, turned in by community members who have cleaned out their medicine cabinets. For information about where to dispose of unused prescriptions visit: http://www.useonlyasdirected.org/drop-off-locator/. In 2010, Utah State Legislature passed House Bill 28, requiring all prescribers of controlled substances to register to use the Utah Controlled Substance Database, take a tutorial, and pass a test on the use of the database and the prescribing guidelines of controlled substances when applying for or renewing their license. In 2011, the Legislature passed Senate Bill 61, which requires prescribers renewing or applying for a controlled substance license to take four hours of controlled substance prescribing classes each licensing period. Information about this program can be found at: http://www.dopl.utah.gov/programs/csdb/index.html. In 2013, the Utah State Legislature passed H.B. 214. This law requires certain controlled substance prescribers to complete at least four hours of continuing education as a requisite for license renewal and requires that at least 3.5 hours of the required continuing education hours be completed in controlled substance prescribing classes. In 2014, the Utah State Legislature passed the Good Samaritan Law (H.B. 11) and the Naloxone Law (H.B. 119). The Good Samaritan Law enables bystanders to report an overdose without fear of criminal prosecution for illegal possession of a controlled substance or illicit drug. The Naloxone Law permits physicians to prescribe naloxone to third parties (someone who is usually a caregiver or a potential bystander to a person at risk for an overdose). It also permits individuals to administer naloxone without legal liability.

Evidence-based Practices

Here are some relevant programs using evidence-based practices. Strengthening Families Program Evidence-based family skills training program http://strengtheningfamiliesprogram.org HALO: Healthy Alternatives for Little Ones Health education and prevention program for children aged 3-6 years http://haloforkids.org/ Programs of Prevention, PRIME for Life Alcohol and drug prevention program for all ages http://www.primeforlife.org Find other evidence-based programs online at nrepp.samhsa.gov.

Available Services

Use Only As Directed Media Campaign www.useonlyasdirected.org The University of Utah: Utah Poison Control Center http://poisoncontrol.utah.edu National Institutes of Health: National Institute on Drug Abuse http://drugabuse.gov Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (UDHS) www.dsamh.utah.gov Partnership for a Drug-Free America www.drugfree.org Office of National Drug Control Policy http://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp

Health Program Information

The Violence and Injury Prevention Program (VIPP) is a trusted and comprehensive resource for data related to violence and injury. Through education, this information helps promote partnerships and programs to prevent injuries and improve public health. VIPP goals are to a) focus prevention efforts on reducing intentional and unintentional injury, b) conduct education aimed at increasing awareness and changing behaviors that contribute to the occurrence of injury, c) strengthen local health department capacity to conduct local injury prevention programs, d) promote legislation, policy changes, and enforcement that will reduce injury hazards and increase safe behaviors, e) collaborate with private and public partners, and f) improve the Utah Department of Health capacity to collect mortality and morbidity data from multiple sources and conduct injury epidemiology for use in prevention planning, implementation, and evaluation.


Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics

During 2011-2013, the drug poisoning death rates in Utahns between 25-64 years of age were significantly higher than the state rate of 19.5 per 100,000 population. Males had a significantly higher drug poisoning death rate compared to females (22.3 and 16.7 per 100,000 population, respectively). For ages 18-34, male drug poisoning death rates were significantly higher than female drug poisoning death rates. Compared to other age groups, very few children died from drug poisonings.

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:


Risk Factors

In Utah, the top five circumstances observed in prescription opioid deaths were substance abuse problem, physical health problem, diagnosed mental illness, history of alcohol abuse, and intimate partner problem. Source: Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury Prevention Program, Prescription Opioid Deaths in Utah, 2011 Fact Sheet http://www.health.utah.gov/vipp/pdf/FactSheets/2012RxOpioidDeaths.pdf (accessed 1/5/2015)

Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Leading Causes of Injury Death by 3-Year Groups, Utah, 2002-2013

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confidence limits

Poisoning is the leading cause of injury death in Utah. In the year 2002, poisoning surpassed motor vehicle traffic death as the leading cause of injury death in Utah. From 2005-2007 to 2011-2013, there has been a statistically significant decrease in motor vehicle crash deaths. From 2008-2010 to 2011-2013, there has been a significant increase in poisoning, fall and suffocation deaths.
3 Year Groups (ending 2007, 2010)Leading Causes of Injury DeathAge-adjusted Rate per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 20
02-04Poisoning17.216.218.31,1057,086,532
02-04Motor Vehicle, Traffic13.112.214.08797,086,232
02-04Firearm10.19.310.96557,086,532
02-04Fall6.65.97.43377,086,532
02-04Suffocation6.05.46.63877,086,532
05-07Poisoning20.919.922.11,4597,580,972
05-07Motor Vehicle, Traffic11.911.112.78577,580,972
05-07Firearm9.99.210.76867,580,972
05-07Fall6.25.66.93497,580,972
05-07Suffocation5.24.75.83767,580,972
08-10Poisoning20.419.321.41,5278,160,874
08-10Motor Vehicle, Traffic9.68.910.37278,160,874
08-10Firearm10.79.911.58038,160,874
08-10Fall8.47.69.15098,160,874
08-10Suffocation5.75.26.34408,160,874
11-13Poisoning23.622.524.71,8558,570,527
11-13Motor Vehicle, Traffic7.97.38.66408,570,527
11-13Firearm12.211.413.09588,570,527
11-13Fall10.09.210.86558,570,527
11-13Suffocation7.06.47.65588,270,527

Data Notes

Data are age-adjusted (2000 U.S. standard population).

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through a collaborative agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau, IBIS Version 2013


Poisoning Deaths by Year, Utah and U.S., 1999-2013

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confidence limits

UT Poisonings, US Poisonings, UT Drug Deaths, US Drug DeathsYearAge-adjusted Rate per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 60
UT Poison Deaths199912.711.214.42492,193,006
UT Poison Deaths200011.710.213.32382,244,502
UT Poison Deaths200110.99.512.52212,283,715
UT Poison Deaths200215.513.817.43182,324,815
UT Poison Deaths200317.615.819.53832,360,137
UT Poison Deaths200418.416.620.44042,401,580
UT Poison Deaths200520.018.122.04512,457,719
UT Poison Deaths200620.418.622.44732,525,507
UT Poison Deaths200722.420.524.45352,597,746
UT Poison Deaths200820.418.622.35002,663,029
UT Poison Deaths200921.820.023.85432,723,421
UT Poison Deaths201018.917.220.74842,774,424
UT Poison Deaths201121.920.123.85642,814,784
UT Poison Deaths201225.423.527.46612,854,871
UT Poison Deaths201323.521.725.56302,900,872
U.S. Poison Deaths19997.119,741279,040,181
U.S. Poison Deaths20007.220,230281,421,906
U.S. Poison Deaths20017.822,242284,968,955
U.S. Poison Deaths20029.226,435287,625,193
U.S. Poison Deaths20039.928,700290,107,933
U.S. Poison Deaths200410.330,308292,805,298
U.S. Poison Deaths200511.032,691295,516,599
U.S. Poison Deaths200612.437,286298,379,912
U.S. Poison Deaths200713.240,059301,231,207
U.S. Poison Deaths200813.441,080304,093,966
U.S. Poison Deaths200913.441,592306,771,529
U.S. Poison Deaths201013.742,917308,745,538
U.S. Poison Deaths201114.646,047311,852,564
U.S. Poison Deaths201214.546,150313,873,685
U.S. Poison Deaths201315.248,545316,128,839
Utah Drug Deaths199910.49.011.92022,193,006
Utah Drug Deaths200010.49.011.92112,244,502
Utah Drug Deaths20019.38.010.81872,283,715
Utah Drug Deaths200214.012.415.72872,324,815
Utah Drug Deaths200315.814.217.63472,360,137
Utah Drug Deaths200416.915.218.83732,401,580
Utah Drug Deaths200518.817.120.84272,457,719
Utah Drug Deaths200619.017.220.94412,525,507
Utah Drug Deaths200720.919.122.95022,597,746
Utah Drug Deaths200818.016.419.84452,663,029
Utah Drug Deaths200919.017.320.84752,723,421
Utah Drug Deaths201016.615.118.34292,774,424
Utah Drug Deaths201119.317.621.14992,814,784
Utah Drug Deaths201222.620.824.65892,854,871
Utah Drug Deaths201321.719.923.55842,900,872
U.S. Drug Deaths19996.016,849279,040,181
U.S. Drug Deaths20006.217,415281,421,906
U.S. Drug Deaths20016.819,394284,968,955
U.S. Drug Deaths20028.223,518287,625,193
U.S. Drug Deaths20038.925,785290,107,933
U.S. Drug Deaths20049.327,424292,805,298
U.S. Drug Deaths200510.029,813295,516,599
U.S. Drug Deaths200611.434,425298,379,912
U.S. Drug Deaths200711.936,010301,231,207
U.S. Drug Deaths200811.936,450304,093,966
U.S. Drug Deaths200912.037,004306,771,529
U.S. Drug Deaths201012.338,329308,745,538
U.S. Drug Deaths201113.241,340311,582,564
U.S. Drug Deaths201213.141,502313,873,685
U.S. Drug Deaths201313.843,982316,128,839

Data Notes

Data are age-adjusted (2000 U.S. standard population). Poisoning deaths are defined as ICD-10 codes X40-X49, Y10-Y19, X60-X69, X85-X90, Y35.2, *U01.6-U01.7. Drug poisoning deaths are a subset of poisoning deaths and are defined as ICD-10 codes X40-44, X60-X64, X85, Y10-Y14. The Consensus Recommendations for National and State Poisoning Surveillance definition of a drug is as follows: A drug is any chemical compound that is chiefly used by or administered to humans or animals as an aid in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of disease or injury, for the relief of pain or suffering, to control or improve any physiologic or pathologic condition, or for the feeling it causes. The definition specifically includes: -Street drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and hallucinogens; -Prescription drugs; -Over-the-counter drugs; -Biological substances such as vaccinations; -Veterinary drugs; -Dietary supplements; and -Non-medicinal substances used primarily for the feeling they cause. The definition specifically excludes: -Alcohol; -Tobacco; and -Chemicals that are deliberately inhaled for the feeling they cause but are chiefly used for other purposes (i.e. organic solvents and halogen derivatives of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons).

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through a collaborative agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau, IBIS Version 2013
  • National Center for Injury Prevention and Control's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)


Poisoning Deaths by Intent and Type (drug vs. other), Utah, 2011-2013

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90.1% of all Utah poisoning deaths are the result of drug ingestion. Of these, 58.7% were unintentional drug overdose deaths, 15.0% were self-inflicted drug overdose deaths, and 26.3% could not be determined whether the decedent had intended suicide or if he or she had an unintentional overdose.
Drug vs. Non-drugIntent of InjuryAge-adjusted Rate per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 6
DrugUnintentional12.411.613.29818,570,527
DrugSuicide3.22.83.72518,570,527
DrugIntent Unknown5.65.06.14398,570,527
OtherUnintentional1.41.11.71078,570,527
OtherSuicide0.80.61.0638,570,527
OtherIntent Unknown0.20.10.3138,570,527

Data Notes

Data are age-adjusted (2000 U.S. standard population). Drug deaths are defined as ICD-10 codes X40-X44, X60-X64, X85, Y10-Y14. Non-drug deaths are defined as ICD-10 codes X45-X49, X65-X69, X86-X90, Y15-Y19, Y35.2, *U01.6-U01.7. The Consensus Recommendations for National and State Poisoning Surveillance definition of a drug is as follows: A drug is any chemical compound that is chiefly used by or administered to humans or animals as an aid in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of disease or injury, for the relief of pain or suffering, to control or improve any physiologic or pathologic condition, or for the feeling it causes. The definition specifically includes: * Street drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and hallucinogens; * Prescription drugs; * Over-the-counter drugs; * Biological substances such as vaccinations; * Veterinary drugs; * Dietary supplements; and * Non-medicinal substances used primarily for the feeling they cause. The definition specifically excludes: * Alcohol; * Tobacco; and * Chemicals that are deliberately inhaled for the feeling they cause but are chiefly used for other purposes (i.e. organic solvents and halogen derivatives of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons).

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through a collaborative agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau, IBIS Version 2013


Poisoning: Drug Deaths by Age and Sex, Utah, 2011-2013

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confidence limits

The drug poisoning death rates in Utahns between 25-64 years of age were significantly higher than the state rate of 19.5 per 100,000 population. Males had a significantly higher drug poisoning death rate compared to females (22.3 and 16.7 per 100,000 population, respectively). For ages 18-34, male drug poisoning death rates were significantly higher than female drug poisoning death rates. Compared to other age groups, very few children died from drug poisonings.
Males vs. FemalesAge GroupRate per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 21
Male17 or Under0.70.41.3*101,369,439
Male18-2424.520.329.3121494,171
Male25-3437.533.042.4254677,229
Male35-4438.033.043.5209549,840
Male45-5449.243.056.0226459,320
Male55-6429.524.335.4114386,603
Male65+7.34.810.627371,993
Female17 or Under0.40.10.9*51,297,078
Female18-2410.98.214.353485,255
Female25-3422.118.626.0144652,424
Female35-4429.324.934.3155528,373
Female45-5444.538.651.1204458,204
Female55-6430.125.036.0120398,702
Female65+6.84.69.730441,896
Total17 or Under0.60.30.9152,666,517
Total18-2417.815.220.6174979,426
Total25-3429.927.133.03981,329,653
Total35-4433.830.437.43641,078,213
Total45-5446.942.551.5430917,524
Total55-6429.826.133.9234785,305
Total65+7.05.39.157813,889

Data Notes

*For males and females ages 17 or under, there are insufficient number of cases to meet the UDOH standard for data reliability, interpret with caution. The Consensus Recommendations for National and State Poisoning Surveillance definition of a drug is as follows: A drug is any chemical compound that is chiefly used by or administered to humans or animals as an aid in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of disease or injury, for the relief of pain or suffering, to control or improve any physiologic or pathologic condition, or for the feeling it causes. The definition specifically includes: -Street drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and hallucinogens; -Prescription drugs; -Over-the-counter drugs; -Biological substances such as vaccinations; -Veterinary drugs; -Dietary supplements; and -Non-medicinal substances used primarily for the feeling they cause. The definition specifically excludes: -Alcohol; -Tobacco; and -Chemicals that are deliberately inhaled for the feeling they cause but are chiefly used for other purposes (i.e. organic solvents and halogen derivatives of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons).

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through a collaborative agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau, IBIS Version 2013


Poisoning: Drug Deaths by Local Health District, Utah, and U.S., 2011-2013

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confidence limits

Local Health DistrictAge-adjusted Drug Deaths per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 14
Bear River16.112.520.570505,498
Central22.116.029.745228,437
Davis County15.312.718.2131949,687
Salt Lake County23.021.324.87123,191,822
Southeast37.227.848.656168,839
Southwest24.220.128.8134630,752
Summit13.57.522.415113,837
Tooele23.016.431.639179,883
TriCounty16.910.925.225165,012
Utah County19.717.322.32691,621,905
Wasatch11.24.822.0*876,124
Weber-Morgan23.820.327.7168738,731
State21.220.222.31,6728,570,527
U.S.13.4126,824941,585,088

Data Notes

Data are age-adjusted (2000 U.S. standard population). *Use caution in interpreting, the estimate has a coefficient of variation >30% and is therefore deemed unreliable by Utah Department of Health standards. The Consensus Recommendations for National and State Poisoning Surveillance definition of a drug is as follows: A drug is any chemical compound that is chiefly used by or administered to humans or animals as an aid in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of disease or injury, for the relief of pain or suffering, to control or improve any physiologic or pathologic condition, or for the feeling it causes. The definition specifically includes: -Street drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and hallucinogens; -Prescription drugs; -Over-the-counter drugs; -Biological substances such as vaccinations; -Veterinary drugs; -Dietary supplements; and -Non-medicinal substances used primarily for the feeling they cause. The definition specifically excludes: -Alcohol; -Tobacco; and -Chemicals that are deliberately inhaled for the feeling they cause but are chiefly used for other purposes (i.e. organic solvents and halogen derivatives of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons).

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through a collaborative agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau, IBIS Version 2013
  • National Center for Injury Prevention and Control's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)


Poisoning: Drug Deaths by Utah Small Area, 2011-2013

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confidence limits

Death rates from drug poisoning varied considerably across the Utah Small Areas. South Salt Lake, Carbon/Emery Counties, Ogden (Downtown), SLC (Glendale), SLC (Downtown) had significantly higher rates than the state rate of 21.2 per 100,000 population. Lehi/Cedar Valley, Morgan/Weber County (East), Riverton/Draper, Logan, South Jordan, and SLC (Foothill/U of U) had significantly lower rates than the state rate of 21.2 per 100,000 population.
Utah Small AreasAge-adjusted Drug Deaths per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 68
Brigham City30.218.047.51971,540
Box Elder Co (Other)13.56.126.0*979,719
Logan11.56.918.221224,821
Cache Co (Oth)/Rich Co (All)17.410.627.120129,399
Ben Lomond19.613.327.832173,045
Morgan Co (All)/Weber Co (E)12.77.120.816131,524
Ogden (Downtown)45.633.460.947111,658
South Ogden25.816.837.827110,006
Roy/Hooper20.213.030.025134,249
Riverdale22.512.936.51778,353
Clearfield/Hill AFB16.510.924.030207,714
Layton16.811.523.634226,416
Syracuse/Kaysville14.08.721.222178,479
Farmington/Centerville15.68.825.516106,375
Woods Cross/North Salt Lake12.76.223.1*1192,903
Bountiful16.09.724.920137,822
SLC (Rose Park)23.614.736.022104,030
SLC (Avenues)14.05.628.9*766,081
SLC (Foothill/U of U)9.23.320.2*670,850
Magna16.48.628.41381,477
SLC (Glendale)43.630.560.33892,458
West Valley (West)21.916.229.050242,263
West Valley (East)19.89.336.8*,#1055,024
West Valley (East) V233.122.347.3##31104,326
SLC (Downtown)39.329.851.061153,227
South Salt Lake65.347.687.34678,862
Millcreek21.514.830.234170,870
Holladay24.216.434.432139,365
Cottonwood16.210.024.822132,075
Kearns24.813.242.5#1465,956
Kearns V226.115.441.5##1979,677
Taylorsville (E)/Murray (W)22.914.434.424110,210
Taylorsville (West)24.414.538.5##1978,547
Murray32.021.446.23198,001
Midvale31.820.746.82788,994
West Jordan (NE)25.212.046.8*,#1035,681
West Jordan (NE) V231.418.749.4##1962,765
West Jordan (SE)19.812.430.222109,137
West Jordan (W)/Copperton18.811.828.424132,381
South Jordan10.86.317.317166,207
Sandy (Center)26.318.835.642161,095
Sandy (NE)19.99.935.61266,657
Sandy (SE)19.911.232.81689,712
Riverton/Draper12.18.616.540354,463
Tooele Co22.415.830.938179,870
Lehi/Cedar Valley13.18.319.827289,111
American Fork/Alpine17.911.726.326164,370
Pleasant Grove/Lindon21.314.330.630166,337
Orem (North)23.114.035.922113,180
Orem (West)17.39.130.01595,601
Orem (East)20.09.836.4*1165,621
Provo (North)/BYU24.614.239.522154,887
Provo (South)25.817.237.437198,108
Springville/Spanish Fork23.017.230.156264,135
Utah Co (South)21.913.433.721110,608
Summit Co14.68.323.816113,833
Wasatch Co12.35.623.5*976,116
TriCounty LHD16.510.624.625165,022
Juab/Millard/Sanpete Co21.614.431.329153,131
Sevier/Piute/Wayne Co24.314.139.21775,688
Carbon/Emery Co56.741.176.34796,204
Grand/San Juan Co13.66.126.2*972,649
St George22.916.730.649233,466
Washington Co (Other)21.915.230.637200,487
Cedar City25.016.336.928126,082
Southwest LHD (Other)29.517.746.32070,671
State21.220.222.31,6728,570,527
U.S.13.4126,824941,585,088

Data Notes

Data are age-adjusted (2000 U.S. standard population). *Use caution in interpreting, the estimate has a coefficient of variation >30% and is therefore deemed unreliable by Utah Department of Health standards. #Due to Utah Small Area reclassification, numbers for 'West Valley (East)', 'Kearns', and 'West Jordan (NE)' only include data for 2011. ##Due to Utah Small Area reclassification, numbers for 'West Valley (East) V2', 'Kearns V2', 'Taylorsville (West)', and 'West Jordan (NE) V2' only include data for 2012-2013. A description of the Utah Small Areas may be found on IBIS at the following URL: http://ibis.health.utah.gov/query/Help.html. The Consensus Recommendations for National and State Poisoning Surveillance definition of a drug is as follows: A drug is any chemical compound that is chiefly used by or administered to humans or animals as an aid in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of disease or injury, for the relief of pain or suffering, to control or improve any physiologic or pathologic condition, or for the feeling it causes. The definition specifically includes: -Street drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and hallucinogens; -Prescription drugs; -Over-the-counter drugs; -Biological substances such as vaccinations; -Veterinary drugs; -Dietary supplements; and -Non-medicinal substances used primarily for the feeling they cause. The definition specifically excludes: -Alcohol; -Tobacco; and -Chemicals that are deliberately inhaled for the feeling they cause but are chiefly used for other purposes (i.e. organic solvents and halogen derivatives of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons).

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population estimates produced by staff in the UDOH Center for Health Data and Informatics. Linear interpolation of U.S. Census Bureau and ESRI ZIP Code data provided annual population estimates for ZIP Code areas by sex and age groups, IBIS Version 2013
  • National Center for Injury Prevention and Control's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)


Poisoning: Drug ED Visits and Hospitalizations by Age Group, Utah, 2010-2012

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

ED visit rates for drug poison ingestion were significantly higher than the state rate of 17.3 per 10,000 population for persons 1 to 4 years of age and 15 to 34 years of age. Persons who were <1 years of age, 5 to 14 years of age, and 45+ had significantly lower rates than the state rate. Hospitalization rates for poison ingestion were significantly higher than the state rate of 8.5 per 10,000 population for persons 15 to 74 years of age. Persons who were 0 to 14 years of age had significantly lower rates than the state rate.
ED Visits vs. HospitalizationsAge GroupDrug Poisoning Rate per 10,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 22
ED Visits<112.811.114.7196153,136
ED Visits1-438.436.940.02,415628,909
ED Visits5-144.94.65.37221,465,787
ED Visits15-2428.227.329.13,8341,360,635
ED Visits25-3421.220.522.02,8381,335,493
ED Visits35-4417.416.618.21,8071,040,713
ED Visits45-5415.514.716.31,423919,246
ED Visits55-649.48.810.1715758,670
ED Visits65-748.57.79.4372437,701
ED Visits75-849.07.810.2221246,743
ED Visits85+10.18.212.39897,046
Hospitalizations<11.30.82.020153,136
Hospitalizations1-41.91.62.3122628,909
Hospitalizations5-141.00.81.21431,465,787
Hospitalizations15-249.69.110.11,3051,360,635
Hospitalizations25-3411.510.912.11,5351,335,493
Hospitalizations35-4412.411.713.11,2901,040,713
Hospitalizations45-5414.013.314.81,291919,246
Hospitalizations55-6410.39.611.1782758,670
Hospitalizations65-749.99.010.8432437,701
Hospitalizations75-848.06.99.2197246,743
Hospitalizations85+8.46.610.48197,046

Data Notes

The Consensus Recommendations for National and State Poisoning Surveillance definition of a drug is as follows: A drug is any chemical compound that is chiefly used by or administered to humans or animals as an aid in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of disease or injury, for the relief of pain or suffering, to control or improve any physiologic or pathologic condition, or for the feeling it causes. The definition specifically includes: -Street drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and hallucinogens; -Prescription drugs; -Over-the-counter drugs; -Biological substances such as vaccinations; -Veterinary drugs; -Dietary supplements; and -Non-medicinal substances used primarily for the feeling they cause. The definition specifically excludes: -Alcohol; -Tobacco; and -Chemicals that are deliberately inhaled for the feeling they cause but are chiefly used for other purposes (i.e. organic solvents and halogen derivatives of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons).

Data Sources

  • Emergency Department Encounter Database, Bureau of Emergency Medical Services, Utah Department of Health
  • Utah Inpatient Hospital Discharge Data, Office of Health Care Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through a collaborative agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau, IBIS Version 2013


Poisoning: Prescription Opioid Deaths by Year, Utah, 2000-2013

::chart - missing::

Prescription drugs include pain medications, also known as opioids, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, fentanyl, and methadone. Deaths as a result of prescription pain medications have increased since 1999. Counts represented in this figure include resident and non-resident unintentional and undetermined prescription pain medication deaths that occurred in Utah.
YearNumber of Deaths Occurring in Utah
Record Count: 14
200060
200194
2002138
2003199
2004217
2005268
2006280
2007326
2008288
2009272
2010236
2011243
2012261
2013270

Data Notes

Prescription drug data is identified through the Office of the Medical Examiner using cause of death text fields to identify if the individual died as a result of a prescription drug overdose. Data is entered in the Utah Violent Death Reporting System (UTVDRS). UTVDRS is a data collection and monitoring system that will help Utahns better understand the public health problem of drug overdose deaths by informing decision makers about the magnitude, trends, and characteristics of drug overdose deaths and to evaluate and continue to improve state-based prevention policies and programs. Data are collected from the Office of the Medical Examiner, Vital Records, and law enforcement agencies and are linked together to help identify risk factors, understand circumstances, and better characterize deaths. UTVDRS is currently in its tenth year of data collection.

Data Source

Utah Department of Health, Office of the Medical Examiner

References and Community Resources

Violence and Injury Prevention Program http://www.health.utah.gov/vipp/RxDrugs/overview.html

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

For an on-line medical dictionary, click on this Dictionary link.

Page Content Updated On 01/22/2015, Published on 01/23/2015
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Wed, 02 September 2015 12:57:06 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:46:13 MDT