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Complete Health Indicator Report of Homicide

Definition

Number of resident deaths resulting from the intentional use of force or power, threatened or actual, against another person, per 100,000 population. ICD-10 codes X85-X99, Y00-Y09, Y87.1, U01-U02.

Numerator

Number of deaths resulting from the intentional use of force or power, threatened or actual, against another person.

Denominator

Total number of persons in the population of Utah.

Data Interpretation Issues

ICD stands for the International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death, such as homicide, on death certificates. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. The 9th revision (ICD-9) is still used for hospital and emergency department visits.

Why Is This Important?

From 2013 to 2017, Utah's age-adjusted homicide rate was 2.2 per 100,000 persons. This is an average of 66 homicides per year. Although Utah has one of the lowest age-adjusted homicide rates in the U.S., infants (less than 1 years of age) and the elderly (ages 85+) have the highest homicide rates compared to other age groups in Utah. Death by homicide takes an enormous toll on the mental and physical well-being of family members, friends, neighbors, and co-workers of the victim. The trauma, grief, and bereavement experienced by these individuals have long-lasting impacts that affect many aspects of their lives.

Healthy People Objective IVP-29:

Reduce homicides
U.S. Target: 5.5 homicides per 100,000 population
State Target: 2 homicides per 100,000 population

Other Objectives

Healthy People Objective 2020 IVP-30: [[br]] Reduce firearm-related deaths[[br]] '''U.S. Target:''' 9.3 deaths per 100,000 population[[br]] '''State Target:''' 9.0 firearm-related deaths per 100,000 population

How Are We Doing?

The 2017 Utah age-adjusted homicide rate was 2.6 per 100,000 population. From 2013 to 2017, males (3.0 per 100,000 population) had a significantly higher age-adjusted homicide rate compared to females (1.4 per 100,000 population). Adults ages 85+ had the highest homicide rates among males and females (5.6 and 3.8 per 100,000 population, respectively).

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Utah's homicide rate has been consistently lower than the national rate. From 2013 to 2017, the age-adjusted homicide rate for the U.S. was 5.5 per 100,000 population. Utah's age-adjusted homicide rate was 2.2 per 100,000 population from 2013 to 2017.

What Is Being Done?

The UDOH Violence and Injury Prevention Program (VIPP) is funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to implement the Utah Violent Death Reporting System (UTVDRS). UTVDRS is a data collection and monitoring system that will help Utahns better understand the public health problem of violence by informing decision makers about the magnitude, trends, and characteristics of violent deaths such as homicide, and to evaluate and continue to improve state-based violence prevention policies and programs. Data are collected from the Office of the Medical Examiner, Vital Records, and law enforcement agencies and are linked together to help identify risk factors, understand circumstances, and better characterize perpetrators of violent deaths. VIPP also coordinates the Domestic Violence Fatality Review Committee (DVFRC) and the Child Fatality Review Committee (CFRC), whose members come from various statewide agencies and disciplines. Based upon the data collected, both committees make recommendations to prevent these deaths.

Available Services

Utah Office of Crime Victim Reparations[[br]] 1-801-238-2360[[br]] Toll-free: 1-800-621-7444[[br]] [http://www.crimevictim.utah.gov/] Utah Domestic Violence Coalition[br]] [https://www.udvc.org/] Statewide Domestic Violence LinkLine[[br]] 1-800-897-LINK (5465)

Health Program Information

The Violence and Injury Prevention Program (VIPP) is a trusted and comprehensive resource for data related to violence and injury. Through education, this information helps promote partnerships and programs to prevent injuries and improve public health. VIPP goals are to a) focus prevention efforts on reducing intentional and unintentional injury, b) conduct education aimed at increasing awareness and changing behaviors that contribute to the occurrence of injury, c) strengthen local health department capacity to conduct local injury prevention programs, d) promote legislation, policy changes, and enforcement that will reduce injury hazards and increase safe behaviors, e) collaborate with private and public partners, and f) improve the Utah Department of Health capacity to collect mortality and morbidity data from multiple sources and conduct injury epidemiology for use in prevention planning, implementation, and evaluation.


Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics

Adults aged 85+ and infants had the highest homicide rates among males and females.

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Risk Factors

Risk factors for violent behavior in youth include history of violent victimization, involvement with drugs, alcohol, or tobacco, low parental involvement, poor monitoring and supervision of children, involvement with gangs, low commitment to school and school failure, high concentrations of poor residents, and socially disorganized neighborhoods.[[br]] [[br]] ---- Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Injury Center: Violence Prevention, Youth Violence: Risk And Protective Factors: [http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/youthviolence/riskprotectivefactors.html#1] (accessed 1/4/2017)

Related Risk Factors Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Homicide by Sex and Year, Utah and U.S., 1999-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

UT M, UT F, US M, US FYearAge-adjusted Rate per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 74
Utah Males19993.32.34.6361,094,405
Utah Males20003.02.04.2351,124,675
Utah Males20014.23.15.6501,144,533
Utah Males20022.81.94.0331,165,962
Utah Males20033.92.85.3441,184,270
Utah Males20042.61.73.7311,204,831
Utah Males20053.22.34.4421,232,978
Utah Males20062.21.43.1281,267,516
Utah Males20073.32.44.4461,305,074
Utah Males20082.11.43.1271,337,398
Utah Males20092.71.83.7351,367,912
Utah Males20101.81.22.6261,394,048
Utah Males20112.21.53.2311,414,350
Utah Males20122.21.53.1311,434,877
Utah Males20132.41.73.4351,458,315
Utah Males20142.61.83.7371,477,967
Utah Males20152.51.83.5411,501,715
Utah Males20163.82.94.9611,532,203
Utah Males20173.32.54.4521,561,688
Utah Females19991.30.72.2151,098,601
Utah Females20001.60.92.6171,119,827
Utah Females20012.21.43.3231,139,182
Utah Females20021.61.02.5201,158,853
Utah Females20031.20.62.0141,175,867
Utah Females20041.00.51.9*111,196,749
Utah Females20051.60.92.4201,224,741
Utah Females20061.60.92.5181,257,991
Utah Females20071.30.72.0181,292,672
Utah Females20081.40.82.2191,325,631
Utah Females20091.20.72.0161,355,509
Utah Females20101.81.22.7241,381,212
Utah Females20111.81.12.7231,401,080
Utah Females20121.10.61.9151,419,345
Utah Females20131.30.72.1171,441,646
Utah Females20141.40.82.1211,460,704
Utah Females20151.20.71.9171,483,202
Utah Females20161.30.82.0191,512,118
Utah Females20171.81.22.6271,540,145
U.S. Males19999.112,785136,802,891
U.S. Males20009.012,820138,458,150
U.S. Males200110.815,555139,891,492
U.S. Males20029.413,640141,230,559
U.S. Males20039.513,882142,428,897
U.S. Males20049.213,578143,828,012
U.S. Males20059.714,376145,197,078
U.S. Males20069.814,717146,647,265
U.S. Males20079.614,538148,064,854
U.S. Males20089.314,135149,489,951
U.S. Males20098.613,126150,807,454
U.S. Males20108.312,774151,783,226
U.S. Males20118.212,745153,263,360
U.S. Males20128.513,208154,467,180
U.S. Males20138.112,726155,589,564
U.S. Males20148.012,546156,780,062
U.S. Males20159.014,274157,960,035
U.S. Males20169.815,467159,078,923
U.S. Females19992.94,104142,237,347
U.S. Females20002.83,945143,713,786
U.S. Females20013.34,753145,077,463
U.S. Females20022.83,998146,394,634
U.S. Females20032.63,850147,679,036
U.S. Females20042.63,779148,977,286
U.S. Females20052.53,748150,319,521
U.S. Females20062.63,856151,732,647
U.S. Females20072.53,823153,166,353
U.S. Females20082.43,691154,604,015
U.S. Females20092.43,673155,964,075
U.S. Females20102.23,485156,964,282
U.S. Females20112.23,493158,399,998
U.S. Females20122.23,480159,531,199
U.S. Females20132.23,395160,615,344
U.S. Females20142.13,326161,783,394
U.S. Females20152.23,519162,936,583
U.S. Females20162.43,895164,048,590

Data Notes

Homicides are determined by using ICD-10 codes X85-X99, Y00-Y09, Y87.1, U01-U02.   [[br]] [[br]] Data are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. [[br]] [[br]] *Use caution in interpreting, the estimate has a relative standard error greater than 30% and does not meet UDOH standards for reliability.

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through a collaborative agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau, IBIS Version 2017
  • National Center for Injury Prevention and Control's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)


Homicide by Local Health District, Utah and U.S., 2013-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Local Health DistrictAge-adjusted Rate per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 15
Bear River1.20.52.2*10873,881
Central3.01.55.5*11386,821
Davis County1.20.71.8211,674,884
Salt Lake County2.72.33.21525,533,501
San Juan****
Southeast3.81.57.8*7202,332
Southwest1.91.13.0191,113,807
Summit****
Tooele2.00.74.3*6316,784
TriCounty5.83.39.516288,487
Utah County1.51.02.0422,882,480
Wasatch**
Weber-Morgan2.71.93.8371,275,579
State of Utah2.22.02.432714,969,703
U.S.5.585,8361,592,790,874

Data Notes

Homicides are determined by using ICD-10 codes X85-X99, Y00-Y09, Y87.1, U01-U02.   [[br]] [[br]]*Use caution in interpreting, the estimate has a relative standard error greater than 30% and does not meet UDOH standards for reliability.[[br]] ^ ^**Data does not meet UDOH standards for reliability. For more information, please go to [http://ibis.health.utah.gov/pdf/resource/DataSuppression.pdf]. Data are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. Prior to 2015 San Juan County was part of the Southeast Local Health District. In 2015 the San Juan County Local Health District was formed. Data reported are for all years using the current boundaries.

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through a collaborative agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau, IBIS Version 2017
  • National Center for Injury Prevention and Control's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)


Homicide by Sex and Age Group, Utah, 2013-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Males vs. FemalesAge GroupRate per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 14
MaleUnder 1 Year4.61.710.0*6131,179
Male1-141.00.61.6181,840,672
Male15-244.63.56.0571,227,067
Male25-444.13.35.0882,146,557
Male45-642.82.03.8421,474,294
Male65-841.70.93.1*11641,352
Male85+5.61.514.5*470,767
FemaleUnder 1 Year3.20.98.2*4124,509
Female1-140.80.41.4141,742,993
Female15-241.00.51.8121,181,148
Female25-441.61.12.3342,071,676
Female45-641.61.02.4241,490,022
Female65-841.20.62.4*9721,062
Female85+3.81.09.6*4106,405

Data Notes

Homicides are determined by using ICD-10 codes X85-X99, Y00-Y09, Y87.1, U01-U02.   [[br]] [[br]]*Use caution in interpreting, the estimate has a relative standard error greater than 30% and does not meet UDOH standards for reliability.

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through a collaborative agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau, IBIS Version 2017


Homicide by Race, Utah, 2013-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

RaceRate per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 5
American Indian/Native Alaskan6.33.610.216228,563
Asian1.50.43.5*5362,384
Black5.72.910.112199,950
Pacific Islander****
White2.01.72.226813,667,929

Data Notes

Homicides are determined by using ICD-10 codes X85-X99, Y00-Y09, Y87.1, U01-U02.   [[br]] [[br]]*Use caution in interpreting, the estimate has a relative standard error greater than 30% and does not meet UDOH standards for reliability.[[br]] ^ ^**Data does not meet UDOH standards for reliability. For more information, please go to [http://ibis.health.utah.gov/pdf/resource/DataSuppression.pdf]. Data are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population using 3 age groups.

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin for Counties in Utah, U.S. Bureau of the Census, IBIS Version 2017


Homicide by Ethnicity, Utah, 2013-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Hispanic EthnicityRate per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 3
Hispanic5.13.96.6922,046,552
Non-Hispanic1.81.62.123312,923,151
All Utahns2.22.02.432714,969,703

Data Notes

Homicides are determined by using ICD-10 codes X85-X99, Y00-Y09, Y87.1, U01-U02.   [[br]] [[br]]Data are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population with 10 age adjustment age groups.

Data Sources

  • Utah Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Utah Department of Health
  • Population Estimates by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin for Counties in Utah, U.S. Bureau of the Census, IBIS Version 2017

References and Community Resources

The Utah Violent Death Reporting System links data from multiple sources to help identify risk factors and understand circumstances in violent deaths, including homicides. For further information visit [http://www.health.utah.gov/vipp/topics/nvdrs/]. National Organization for Victims Assistance (NOVA)[[br]] [https://www.trynova.org/]

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

For an on-line medical dictionary, click on this Dictionary link.

Page Content Updated On 10/31/2018, Published on 11/16/2018
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Fri, 14 December 2018 5:46:13 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 11:33:34 MST