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Complete Health Indicator Report of Family Meals

Definition

The percentage of adults who live in households where family members ate meals together at least five or more times in the past seven days

Numerator

Number of adults who live in households where family members ate meals together at least five or more times in the past seven days

Denominator

All adults in households with children under the age of 18

Why Is This Important?

A number of studies indicate that eating meals as a family is associated with increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Adolescents who eat more meals with their families may have lower consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and have a lower body mass index (BMI) than their counterparts who eat fewer meals with their family. Caregivers who encourage family meals may model healthier eating habits for their children.

Other Objectives

This question supports the efforts of the State Health Improvement Plan which intends to unite the work of Utah Public Health System through collective effort with all 13 local health departments. Goal 1 is "Utahns are Eating Healthy and Living Active Lives" with the Strategy 2 "Promote Health Family Meals."

How Are We Doing?

The question was first asked in the 2013 BRFSS. At that time 69.7% adults reported eating family meals together more than 5 times a week. In 2015 BRFSS, 63.3% of adults reported eating family meals together more than 5 times a week.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

This data is not available for the U.S.

What Is Being Done?

Governor Gary Herbert declared September as Healthy Utah Family Meals Month. He declared it for the first time in 2014 and every subsequent year since. Local health departments are conducting an annual campaign to increase the number of meals family members eat together. EPICC created a video with Utah Lt. Governor Spencer Cox that shows him in his home preparing and eating a meal with his family. Please see [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8TbyF4aN9Y].


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Health Status Outcomes

Frequency of family meals has been positively associated with intake of fruits and vegetables in adults, and negatively associated with sweets and sugar-sweetened beverages in adolescents. Family meals have been positively correlated with perceived family cohesion.[[br]] [[br]] ---- Welsh EM, French SA, Wall M. Examining the relationship between family meal frequency and individual dietary intake: does family cohesion play a role? J Nutr Educ Behav. 2011;43(4):229?35.

Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Family Meals by Food Insecurity, Utah, 2015

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confidence limits

Percentage of adults who reported eating together as a family 5 or more times a week with high food insecurity (Yes, 53.1%) versus percentage of adults who reported eating together as a family 5 or more times a week with low food insecurity (No, 64.4%).
Yes/NoAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 2
Yes53.1%46.8%59.3%
No64.4%62.4%66.4%

Data Notes

The question was only asked to adults in households with children under the age of 18.   Age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health


Family Meals by Fruit Consumption, Utah, 2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Individuals who reported a daily fruit consumption of 2 or more fruits reported eating more family meals (5 or more times a week, 71.8%) compared to individuals who reported daily fruit consumption of 2 or more fruits (5 or more time a week, 59.6%).
Yes/NoAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 2
Yes71.8%68.5%74.8%
No59.6%57.1%62.0%

Data Notes

The question was only asked to adults in households with children under the age of 18.   Age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health


Family Meals by Income, Utah, 2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

There is no statistically significant differences between income category and family meals eaten together.
Income CategoryAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 5
<$25,00057.3%52.3%62.1%
$25,000-$49,99966.6%61.8%71.0%
$50,000-$74,99963.0%58.1%67.7%
$75,000+65.7%62.2%69.1%
Total63.3%61.2%65.2%

Data Notes

The question was only asked to adults in households with children under the age of 18.   Age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health


Family Meals by Obesity, Utah, 2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

There is no statistically significant differences between weight category and family meals eaten together.
Weight CategoryAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 3
Normal63.6%60.5%66.7%
Overweight63.0%59.7%66.4%
Obese64.5%60.0%68.7%

Data Notes

The question was only asked to adults in households with children under the age of 18.   Age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health


Family Meals by Ethnicity, Utah, 2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

There is no statistically significant differences between ethnicity category and family meals eaten together.
Hispanic EthnicityAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 3
Hispanic62.3%56.0%68.1%
Non-Hispanic63.1%61.0%65.2%
All Utahns63.3%61.3%65.2%

Data Notes

The question was only asked to adults in households with children under the age of 18.   Age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health


Family Meals by Sex, Utah, 2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

There are no statistically significant differences between sex category and family meals eaten together.
SexAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 3
Male61.8%59.0%64.5%
Female64.8%62.0%67.5%
All63.3%61.3%65.2%

Data Notes

The question was only asked to adults in households with children under the age of 18.   Age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health


Family Meals by Local Health District, Utah, 2015

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Overall 63.3% of adults reported eating a meal together as a family 5 or more times a week.
Local Health DistrictAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 14
Bear River67.2%61.2%72.7%
Central71.3%61.9%79.3%
Davis County59.2%53.3%64.9%
Salt Lake County61.1%57.8%64.3%
San Juan92.1%86.5%95.5%
Southeast78.1%70.4%84.2%
Southwest70.5%64.5%75.9%
Summit58.8%45.2%71.1%
Tooele60.7%51.2%69.5%
TriCounty74.1%65.4%81.3%
Utah County63.9%58.7%68.8%
Wasatch67.4%53.2%79.0%
Weber-Morgan60.2%52.0%67.9%
State of Utah63.3%61.3%65.2%

Data Notes

The question was only asked to adults in households with children under the age of 18.   Age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health


Family Meals by Race, Utah, 2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Race/EthnicityAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 7
American Indian/Native Alaskan63.8%49.0%76.3%
Asian45.3%34.7%56.3%
Black69.0%52.9%81.6%
Pacific Islander53.8%36.1%70.6%
White63.6%61.5%65.6%
Other65.7%57.0%73.5%
All Races63.3%61.3%65.2%

Data Notes

The question was only asked to adults in households with children under the age of 18.   Age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health


Family Meals by Vegetable Consumption, Utah, 2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Individuals who reported a daily vegetable consumption of 3 or more reported eating more family meals (5 or more times a week, 73.4%) compared to individuals who reported a daily vegetable consumption of less than 3 (5 or more times a week 61.3%).
Yes/NoAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 2
Yes73.4%69.0%77.3%
No61.3%59.1%63.5%

Data Notes

The question was only asked to adults in households with children under the age of 18.   Age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health

References and Community Resources

MyPlate, MyWins for Families has tips for involving children and teens in family meals. See [https://www.choosemyplate.gov/families#kids]. Dwyer, L., Oh, A., Patrick, H., & Hennessy, E. (2015). Promoting family meals: a review of existing interventions and opportunities for future research. Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, 6, 115-131. [http://doi.org/10.2147/AHMT.S37316] Hauser SI, Economos CD, Nelson ME, Goldberg JP, Hyatt RR, Naumova EN, et al. Household and family factors related to weight status in first through third graders: a cross-sectional study in Eastern Massachusetts. BMC Pediatr. 2014;14(1):1. Larson NI, Neumark-Sztainer D, Hannan PJ, Story M. Family meals during adolescence are associated with higher diet quality and healthful meal patterns during young adulthood. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(9):1502-10. Rockett HRH. Family Dinner: More than Just a Meal. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1498-501. Welsh EM, French SA, Wall M. Examining the relationship between family meal frequency and individual dietary intake: does family cohesion play a role? J Nutr Educ Behav. 2011;43(4):229-35.

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

For an on-line medical dictionary, click on this Dictionary link.

Page Content Updated On 09/07/2017, Published on 09/07/2017
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sat, 21 April 2018 18:44:35 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Thu, 7 Sep 2017 15:41:37 MDT