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Complete Health Indicator Report of Arthritis and Activity Limitation

Definition

Utah adults 18 years of age and older with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who report limiting any activities because of their arthritis.

Numerator

Respondents who answered "Yes" to the following Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System question were included in the numerator: "Are you now limited in any way in any activities because of arthritis or joint symptoms?" Responses of "Don't know/Not sure", "Refused", and those with "Missing" responses were excluded.

Denominator

Number of respondents who reported being told by a healthcare professional they had some form of arthritis. Responses of "Don't know/Not sure" or "Refused", and those with "Missing" responses were excluded.

Why Is This Important?

Arthritis is a disabling disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the percent of adults limited by arthritis has increased by about 20 percent since 2002 with the everyday activities, such as holding a cup or walking up stairs, for 24 million adults are limited.[https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/pdf/2017-03-vitalsigns.pdf 1] Adults with arthritis are also less likely to be working than those without arthritis. Monitoring the prevalence of arthritis-attributable activity limitation among adults is important for estimating the need for intervention programs to reduce the disabling effects of arthritis, and to estimate how well existing intervention programs are working. These programs include self-management education programs and physical activity programs that have been shown to reduce pain and costs as well as improve physical function, mental health, and quality of life. Arthritis-attributable activity limitation can be prevented or reduced in many persons. For example, aerobic and strengthening exercises can improve physical function and self-reported disability among older disabled adults. In addition, for persons with arthritis who are not limited in activity, regular physical activity can reduce the risk for functional activity limitation. Arthritis self-management education classes can also reduce pain and disability.

Healthy People Objective AOCBC-2:

Reduce the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who experience a limitation in activity due to arthritis or joint symptoms
U.S. Target: 35.5 percent
State Target: 37.0 percent

Other Objectives

Healthy People 2020 Objective AOCBC-7.2: Increase the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who receive health care provider counseling for physical activity or exercise.[[br]] '''U.S. Target:''' 45.3 percent

How Are We Doing?

The 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey revealed that nearly half (45.5 percent) of Utah adults with arthritis (crude rate) limited their usual activities due to their arthritis. Despite the known benefits of exercise for persons with arthritis, in 2015, 46.8 percent of Utah adults with arthritis reported they did not meet the recommended requirements for aerobic physical activity, and 27.4 percent reported no leisure time physical activity (i.e. were physically inactive).

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

In 2015, the age-adjusted rate of activity limitation due to arthritis was 45.0 percent in Utah, which was slightly better than the U.S. rate of 49.2 percent. Because age affects the likelihood of having arthritis, it is beneficial to adjust for the effect of age when comparing populations. This method helps to determine if a certain population has a factor, which contributes to arthritis more than the effect of age. Therefore, these data were adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

What Is Being Done?

The Utah Arthritis Program focuses on measuring the occurrence of arthritis in Utah, increasing arthritis awareness and educational opportunities, and promoting participation in programs proven to help persons with arthritis, pain, and other chronic conditions.

Evidence-based Practices

The Utah Arthritis Program (UAP) partners with healthcare, nonprofit, and government organizations across Utah to deliver evidence-based workshops to help people better manage arthritis, pain, and other chronic conditions. Schedules and locations of these workshops can be found at [http://livingwell.utah.gov/]. The UAP recommends and supports the *Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs, EnhanceFitness, Walk With Ease, Living Well with a Disability, and the Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program which have been proven to improve the quality of life for people with arthritis and other chronic conditions. *Chronic Disease Self-Management programs include:[[br]] - Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) as known as Living Well with Chronic Conditions[[br]] - Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP) also known as Living Well with Diabetes[[br]] - Chronic Pain Self-Management Program (CPSMP) also known as Living Well with Chronic Pain[[br]] - Tomando Control de su Salud (Spanish CDSMP)[[br]] - Better Choices Better Health (online CDSMP)[[br]] [[br]] For additional information on these programs visit [http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/interventions.htm] or [http://livingwell.utah.gov/].

Available Services

To find and register for an evidence-based program in your area please visit:[[br]] [http://www.livingwell.utah.gov][[br]] or call the Health Resource Line at:[[br]] 1-888-222-2542[[br]] [[br]] Utah Department of Health Arthritis Program[[br]] Bureau of Health Promotion[[br]] P.O. Box 142107[[br]] Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-2107[[br]] (801) 538-9458[[br]] [http://www.health.utah.gov/arthritis][[br]] [[br]] Arthritis Foundation Great West Region[[br]] 448 East 400 South, Suite 103[[br]] Salt Lake City, Utah 84111[[br]] (801) 536-0990[[br]] [[br]] Utah Division of Aging and Adult Services[[br]] Department of Human Resources[[br]] 195 N. 1950 W.[[br]] SLC, Utah 84116[[br]] (801) 538-3910[[br]] [https://daas.utah.gov/][[br]] [[br]] University of Utah[[br]] Department of Immunology and Rheumatology[[br]] School of Medicine[[br]] 50 North Medical Drive[[br]] Salt Lake City, Utah 84132[[br]] (801) 581-7724[[br]] [[br]] The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital[[br]] 5770 S. 300 E.[[br]] Murray, Utah 84123[[br]] (801) 314-4100[[br]] [https://intermountainhealthcare.org/locations/the-orthopedic-specialty-hospital/][[br]] [[br]] Salt Lake County Aging Services[[br]] 2001 S. State[[br]] Salt Lake City, Utah 84190-2300[[br]] (385) 468-3200

Health Program Information

The mission of the Utah Arthritis Program (UAP) is to improve the quality of life for people affected by arthritis. The UAP is focused on measuring the occurrence of arthritis in Utah, improving arthritis awareness, and increasing participation in programs proven to help those with doctor-diagnosed arthritis. The UAP works closely with the CDC, the Arthritis Foundation, and local health districts and others to provide effective programs.


Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics

The population characteristic most relevant to arthritis is the age distribution of the population. Anyone can develop arthritis, but the risk increases as people age. As the Utah population ages, a greater percentage of Utahns will be at risk for developing arthritis.

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Health Care System Factors

Utah's aging population is likely to lead to an increase in prevalence of arthritis that will have dramatic consequences in terms of activity limitation and health care expenditures. Access to health care is a problem for many Utahns. Individuals who cannot obtain needed health care tend to have higher rates of activity limitations from chronic disease. Cost is the most commonly reported barrier to getting needed health care.

Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:


Risk Factors

The risk of arthritis is linked to being overweight and obese and to physical inactivity. Females have higher rates of arthritis than males. The prevalence of arthritis also increases with age. White, non-Hispanic and non-White, non-Hispanic individuals are more likely to report arthritis than Hispanic/Latinos.

Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Health Status Outcomes

In 2016, 28.2 percent of Utah adults with arthritis reported being in fair or poor health, and 32.3 percent reported experiencing seven or more days in the last month when their physical health was not good.

Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Age-adjusted Percentage of Adults With Arthritis Who Reported Limiting Their Usual Activities due to Arthritis, Utah and U.S., 2003-2015 Odd Years Only

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Please note that the rates in this graph have been adjusted for age.
BRFSS Utah vs. U.S.YearAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 15
UT Old Methodology200327.0%24.3%29.8%
UT Old Methodology200528.5%26.1%31.1%
UT Old Methodology200725.1%22.8%27.5%
UT Old Methodology200941.3%37.7%44.9%
US Old Methodology200336.0%35.1%36.9%
US Old Methodology200535.0%34.1%35.9%
US Old Methodology200736.7%35.6%37.7%
US Old Methodology200942.4%41.4%43.4%
UT New Methodology200944.9%40.9%49.0%
UT New Methodology201150.4%46.5%54.4%
UT New Methodology201346.1%42.3%49.9%
UT New Methodology201545.0%41.1%49.0%
US New Methodology201150.9%49.8%51.9%
US New Methodology201350.0%49.0%51.0%
US New Methodology201549.2%48.1%50.2%

Data Notes

Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is self-reported in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and was not confirmed by a health-care provider. However, such self-reports have been shown to be acceptable for surveillance purposes. Activity limitation is also self-reported.   Beginning in 2011, BRFSS data include both landline and cell phone respondent data along with a new weighting methodology called iterative proportional fitting, or raking. Both of these methodology changes were implemented to account for an increased number of U.S. households without landline phones and an under-representation of certain demographic groups that were not well-represented in the sample. More details about these changes can be found at: [http://health.utah.gov/opha/publications/brfss/Raking/Raking%20impact%202011.pdf] Because age affects the likelihood of having arthritis, it is beneficial to adjust for the effect of age when comparing populations. This method helps to determine if a certain population has a factor, which contributes to arthritis more than the effect of age. Therefore, these data have been age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. Rates are based on five age groups: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, and 65+.

Data Sources

  • Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health
  • U.S. Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), Division of Behavioral Surveillance, CDC Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services


Percentage of Utah Adults With Arthritis Who Reported Limiting Their Usual Activities due to Arthritis by Age and Sex, 2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Crude percentage of adults reporting activity limitation due to their arthritis.
Males vs. FemalesAge GroupPercentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 8
Male18-3431.8%19.9%46.7%
Male35-4941.0%32.2%50.4%
Male50-6444.2%38.3%50.3%
Male65+46.0%40.1%51.9%
Female18-3446.3%34.0%58.9%
Female35-4948.6%40.1%57.1%
Female50-6450.0%45.1%54.8%
Female65+44.2%39.7%48.8%

Data Notes

Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is self-reported in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and was not confirmed by a health-care provider. However, such self-reports have been shown to be acceptable for surveillance purposes. Activity limitation is also self-reported.

Data Source

Utah Data: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health

References and Community Resources

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2017, March 7). Arthritis in America. Retrieved from [https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/pdf/2017-03-vitalsigns.pdf] Resources:[[br]] [http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/interventions.htm][[br]] [https://dsamh.utah.gov/][[br]] [http://www.health.utah.gov/arthritis][[br]] [https://daas.utah.gov/][[br]] [http://namiut.org/][[br]] [https://www.valleycares.com/contact/]

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

For an on-line medical dictionary, click on this Dictionary link.

Page Content Updated On 12/04/2017, Published on 01/09/2018
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://ibis.health.state.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Thu, 19 July 2018 2:04:18 from Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.gov ".

Content updated: Tue, 9 Jan 2018 16:59:41 MST